Nichiren

  • Interview with Nichiren Buddhist Singer Ifé Sanchez Mora Paid Member

    Ifé Sanchez Mora, known onstage as just Ifé, is a NY-based singer, songwriter, and Nichiren Daishonin practitioner. A Detroit native, Ifé pulls from a wide variety of musical influences, including those from her Mexican and African heritage as well as American blues, rock, and soul music, seamlessly melding them into her own distinctive sound. (You can give her music a listen February 5, when her new album Fire Inside of Me is released.) Ifé, born into the Nichiren Buddhist tradition, became comfortable with her own voice through chanting practice, and her deep connection to Buddhism inspires and influences her music to this day. Tricycle’s Alex Caring-Lobel spoke with Ifé over the phone about the essence of Nichiren and Soka Gakkai, the influence of her practice on her career, and the importance of community.   More »
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    Understanding Nichiren Buddhism Paid Member

    While Tricycle is a nonsectarian and independent publication, most of our content reflects a perspective of what might be called meditation-oriented Buddhism. Most of our readers and contributors know Buddhism primarily in terms of the meditation traditions of Zen, Vipassana, or Vajrayana as they have been presented to a Western audience. Indeed, it is probably not an exaggeration to say that, for many of our readers, approaches to Buddhism, such as Nichiren, that are not based on a practice of quiet, focused sitting meditation are, other than in name, scarcely recognizable as Buddhist at all. More »
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    A Right to the Dharma: An interview with Myokei Caine-Barrett, Shonin, a Nichiren Shu priest Paid Member

    The current issue of Tricycle features an interview with Myokei Caine-Barrett, Shonin, a Nichiren priest and the resident teacher at Myoken-ji, a temple in Houston, Texas. The daughter of an African American father and a Japanese mother, Myokei Shonin is the first woman of African American and Japanese descent—and the only Western woman—to be ordained as a priest within the worldwide Nichiren Order. (She is also the first female priest in the Nichiren Order of North America.) From "A Right to the Dharma": More »
  • Discuss the Lotus Sutra Paid Member

    In the third part of the discussion series, "Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners," Princeton's Jacqueline Stone discusses the Lotus Sutra: Q: What is the Lotus Sutra about? In it we read how to hear the sutra, how to preach the sutra, who was gathered to hear it preached, what happened before it was preached, why it is so important, how it was preached in the past, what will happen in the future to those who hear it, and so on. It is like an extravagant preamble to an event that never seems to arrive. A: Some scholars of the Lotus Sutra have noted just that point, and I think it is a fair reading. If we just read the sutra, and set aside later interpretations, one thing we see going on is that the sutra is establishing its own authority. For example, at the beginning the Buddha emerges from meditation and begins to preach spontaneously, and not, as is usually the case, in response to a question. More »
  • First Nichiren Shu Female Priest talks suffering, prison work, and sanghas in communities of color Paid Member

    Yesterday's CNN online opinion section featured a piece by Myokei Caine-Barrett, a Nichiren Buddhist teacher based at the Myoken-ji Temple in Texas. Within the Nichiren Order, Caine-Barrett is the first woman of Japanese and African descent, the only ordained Western woman, and the first female priest in the Nichiren Order of North America. Caine-Barrett came across Buddhism during a quest for a path of faith. As a young child, she hoped that devotion to a religion would help her deal with the isolation she felt as a mixed-raced child living in a world divided by black and white. Since discovering Buddhism at the age of 13, Caine-Barrett says that Buddhist practice has allowed her to better understand reality: More »
  • SGI president calls for fast-tracking nuclear weapons ban Paid Member

    As we approach the 65th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Daisaku Ikeda, president of Soka Gakkai International (SGI) has called for an early start to negotiations to abolish nuclear weapons. In an interview with IDN-InDepthNews, Ikeda responded to a question about whether the UN's conference on the nuclear nonproliferation treaty in May offered real hope or just more platitudes: More »