News

  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of December 10 Paid Member

    A couple months ago a review copy of the book How to Think More about Sex came to the Trike offices (we didn't order it, I swear). I remember looking at it quizzically—I'm feeling literary today, so let's say I looked at it with a furrowed brow—thinking, why would anyone want to think more about sex? Certainly we could all stand to think a little less about it. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of December 3 Paid Member

    Frolicking around the Buddhist interwebz today, I stumbled upon the very cool new project Radio Buddha. It's an Internet radio station that streams multi-tradition Buddhist dharma talks, sutras, and prayers 24/7. 24/7! And it's all free! Right now the line-up is leaning heavily on the Tibetan side, but perhaps as they gather more audio content the schedule will become more well-rounded. More »
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    World Buddhist Leaders Response to the Growing Ethnic Violence Against Muslims in Myanmar Paid Member

    In response to the recent ethnic violence against Muslims in Burma's Rakhine state, which has often been supported and perpetuated by the area's Buddhists, international Buddhist leaders have produced this statement, due to be published in Burmese newspapers this week: WORLD BUDDHIST LEADERS RESPONSE TO THE GROWING ETHNIC VIOLENCE AGAINST MUSLIMS IN MYANMAR More »
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    Neuroscience Fiction in the New Yorker Paid Member

    Since Alissa Quart's "neuro-critical" Times op-ed, which we covered on the blog last week, The New Yorker has followed suit. On The New Yorker's News Desk blog, Gary Marcus reports on the recent history of the preponderence of neuroscientific explanations in the mainstream media despite several setbacks within the field and a number of overlooked books which seriously undermine neuroscience's most sensational claims. This brief history extends up to the publication of Quart's op-ed last week, which Marcus announces as the entry of these concerns into the mainstream. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of November 26 Paid Member

    Tibetan self-immolations are continuing at an alarming rate. Since the last Buddha Buzz post on November 16, 14 more Tibetans have set themselves on fire to protest the Chinese rule. There's no denying that the self-immolations are occurring with greater frequency. Out of the 89 self-immolations since 2009, 27 of them—about 30%—have taken place this month, according to the International Campaign for Tibet. Two weeks ago, British monk Tonden (David Alain) became the first non-Tibetan to self-immolate, setting himself on fire in the garden of Nalanda monastery, in France, where the resident monks were in retreat. More »
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    "Neuroscience: Under Attack" in the New York Times Paid Member

    If you get the Sunday Times you probably saw Alissa Quart's clever op-ed on the backlash against the perfunctory extrapolations and sweeping claims made by popular neuroscience. The danger of false positives in neuroimaging has been brought to the attention of the public eye over the last several years (remember those neuroscientists that imaged brain activity in a dead salmon?). Quart's piece, however, doesn't just lay blame on shoddy science and premature conclusions drawn by neuroscientists, it also examines the culture that allows neuroscientific explanations to supplant other viable interpretations of experience. More »