Mindfulness

  • Meditation Month: Day 9 Paid Member

    There is only one way to walk in New York City: mindfully. Actually, let me back up. You don't have to walk mindfully in New York, but if you don't you're roadkill. (In fact, the main reason that you should walk mindfully is because so many people don't.) Most of the time you have to be prepared to move quickly, to avoid other walkers, taxis, bicyclists, or a crazy person. At other times you need to exercise patience—waiting for the next subway or slowly shuffling through a bottle neck situation at Grand Central during rush hour. Either way, if you find yourself walking in New York, Peter Doobinin had some good advice in today's Daily Dharma: More »
  • Mindful Eating: You Saw It Here First Paid Member

    Mindful eating has hit the New York Times! One of our sharp-eyed editors spied this article yesterday in the Dining and Wine section of the Gray Lady: "Mindful Eating as Food for Thought." In it, Jeff Gordinier writes about his visit to the Blue Cliff Monastery in Pine Bush, N.Y., where he participated in a silent, vegan, mindfully-eaten lunch, something he found to be "captivating and mysterious." (Afterward, he tweeted, "& yeah I tried this mindful eating thing @ the monastery. Very cool. But not easy. Even putting my fork down was hard!") But it's not just the New York Times who has trumpeted mindful eating. As Gordinier says in the article, More »
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    Buddha Buzz: Yue-yue, Jon Kabat-Zinn, and an Anonymous Monk Paid Member

    Our first Buddha Buzz item this week was brought to my attention by a Tweet from the blogger behind American Buddhist Perspective, Justin Whitaker. It's about a photo that recently struck a chord with China and the world, of an anonymous monk praying over the dead body of a man in a Chinese train station: More »
  • Occupy the Moment: A 99¢ Book for the 99% Paid Member

    Rick Heller, editor of the online magazine The New Humanism, self-identified secular Buddhist, and Occupy Boston activist, recently released the eBook, Occupy the Moment: A Mindful Path to a New Economy. It combines Buddhist teachings with neuroscience to frame a discussion of mindful activism and the Occupy movement. Heller specifically focuses on the three poisons—greed, hatred, and delusion—and how an understanding of all of them, and in particular, greed, can shape how we go about changing society for the better. From Occupy the Moment's introduction: More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Mindfulness for Doctors, Meditation's Downfalls, and the Avian Flu Paid Member

    A sobering article out of the NY Times this week called “As Doctors Use More Devices, Potential for Distraction Grows.” From the article: Hospitals and doctors’ offices, hoping to curb medical error, have invested heavily to put computers, smartphones and other devices into the hands of medical staff for instant access to patient data, drug information and case studies. More »
  • Mindfulness Exercise: This Person Could Die Tonight Paid Member

    We are currently reading Jan Chozen Bays's How to Train a Wild Elephant: And Other Adventures in Mindfulness at the Tricycle Book Club. Each week in November, Bays will present us with a new mindfulness exercise that relates to the theme of gratitude. The fourth and final exercise is posted below. Give it a try and then join us at the discussion to tell us how it goes. Pick up a copy of the book here. More »