Mindfulness

  • Tricycle Talk with UPenn Professor Justin McDaniel Paid Member

    Today's Tricycle Talk is with Justin McDaniel, a Religious Studies professor at the University of Pennsylvania. A former Buddhist monk who identifies as both a Buddhist and a Catholic, he's got a Buddhist-related academic background of champions: a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Sanskrit and Indian Studies, also from Harvard. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: The Cult's Ian Astbury and Some Hard Partyin' Monks Paid Member

    It's Friday the thirteenth (paraskevidekatriaphobics, beware) and what better way to celebrate than with an interview with "smash-and-grab Buddhist" Ian Astbury, veteran grunger and bandmember of The Cult? As the interview begins on the Huffington Post, "It might be argued that the visceral whack of The Cult's brand of heavy, dharma-conscious rock is just the kind of Zen stick a sleepy pop culture needs administered to its backside." I missed the fan cult of The Cult back in the 80s, so I can't really throw in my opinion on this. But we don't have to take the interviewer at his word: we have YouTube! Here's The Cult performing "She Sells Sanctuary" and perhaps whacking you with their dharma-conscious Zen music stick:   More »
  • Tricycle Talk with Professional Organizer Andrew Mellen Paid Member

    Spring for me is always the same. Come March, the flowers are blossoming, the birds are chirping, and the grumpy New Yorkers around me are glaring with slightly less menace. Everything is a little brighter and a little warmer. With the feeling of newness wafting in the air, I finally drudge up enough courage to look around at the mess I've made all winter long and clean. Spring cleaning! It always starts so well. But in an hour I'm quite like the Mole in the first page of Kenneth Grahame's book The Wind in the Willows: More »
  • Meditation Month: Day 13 Paid Member

    Lucky day 13. With all the luck from today and all the love accumulating in advance for tomorrow, here's hoping that today is a good day to be a meditator. As for me, I'm not sure yet—I haven't had a chance to practice yet today. But I'm excited to, and I will. Over the weekend I re-read Bhante Henepola Gunaratana's book Mindfulness in Plain English. It was the first book on meditation that I ever read. I love that book. I owe a lot to it. And reading it again made me feel like I did the first time I read it: just so excited. Like a child. More »
  • Meditation Month: Day 9 Paid Member

    There is only one way to walk in New York City: mindfully. Actually, let me back up. You don't have to walk mindfully in New York, but if you don't you're roadkill. (In fact, the main reason that you should walk mindfully is because so many people don't.) Most of the time you have to be prepared to move quickly, to avoid other walkers, taxis, bicyclists, or a crazy person. At other times you need to exercise patience—waiting for the next subway or slowly shuffling through a bottle neck situation at Grand Central during rush hour. Either way, if you find yourself walking in New York, Peter Doobinin had some good advice in today's Daily Dharma: More »
  • Mindful Eating: You Saw It Here First Paid Member

    Mindful eating has hit the New York Times! One of our sharp-eyed editors spied this article yesterday in the Dining and Wine section of the Gray Lady: "Mindful Eating as Food for Thought." In it, Jeff Gordinier writes about his visit to the Blue Cliff Monastery in Pine Bush, N.Y., where he participated in a silent, vegan, mindfully-eaten lunch, something he found to be "captivating and mysterious." (Afterward, he tweeted, "& yeah I tried this mindful eating thing @ the monastery. Very cool. But not easy. Even putting my fork down was hard!") But it's not just the New York Times who has trumpeted mindful eating. As Gordinier says in the article, More »