Mindfulness

  • Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt Paid Member

    Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt is a new book from Parallax Press by landscape architect and author Zachiah Murray, with a foreword by Thich Nhat Hanh. Predicated upon the Zen conviction that the garden is a perfect place to practice mindfulness, the book offers a series simple short verses, called gathas, to assist us in cultivating deep awareness through the practice of gardening. The following excerpt begins the book. Entering the Garden Entering the gardenI see my true nature.In its reflectionmy heart is at peace. We cross many thresholds in our lives. Some thresholds are monumental—being born, learning to walk, starting school, graduating, getting our first job, losing our first job, getting married, giving birth, and dying. Other thresholds are subtle—moving from one room to another, passing through a gate, or crossing an intersection. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of September 3 Paid Member

    Water, water, everywhere, and not a drop to drink. These days when I read about Buddhism in the mainstream media—heck, when I read about Buddhism in the Buddhist media—it's more like, mindfulness, mindfulness, everywhere, and not a drop of dharma. It's not that I have anything against mindfulness. It's just that I can't jump on the mindfulness craze bandwagon because every time I read an article about so-called "mindfulness" I'm reminded of a visit that Thai forest monk and Pali expert Thanissaro Bhikkhu paid to the Tricycle offices a few months ago. While he was here, I asked him what Buddhist concept he thinks Western Buddhists most commonly misunderstand. He responded, "mindfulness." Oof. We are in trouble. More »
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    The Mind Business Paid Member

    "Yoga, meditation, 'mindfulness' ... Some of the west's biggest companies are embracing eastern spirituality as a path that can lead to bigger profits." That's the subhead of "The Mind Business," an article that appeared last weekend in the Financial Times. (The online version drops the "bigger profits" angle in the subhead). The point of the article is that Buddhist mindfulness practice and other "eastern spiritual practices" have entered the corporate mainstream, and the trend seems to have hit its stride at General Mills, where some 3,000 employees can avail themselves of the practices. The program's founder explains: More »
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    The Mindful Manifesto Paid Member

    Mindfulness isn't just for Buddhists anymore; you can find it in hospitals, schools, prisons, and in some of today’s largest corporations. It is being used to help people quell their cravings, find emotional balance, eat healthier, and even to fall asleep at night. All of these things are well and good, of course, but there's a question worth considering: Is anything lost when we remove mindfulness meditation from a Buddhist context? More »
  • Watch: Taming a Wild Horse Paid Member

    You can't force meditation. Though many of us think that the more effort we apply during meditation the quicker or better the results will be, this is not how meditation works. In this short animation Meditation Doctor Andy Puddicombe explains the ins and outs of applying effort during meditation.Every Tuesday we feature new teachings by Andy at our "Introduction to Mindfulness" series. Read today's teaching. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: A Dog is a Pig is a Bear is a Boy Paid Member

    We're tackling the big issues in Buddha Buzz today: capitalism, vegetarianism, and Buddhist business.  In an article reminiscent of Tricycle's own "Occupy Buddhism: Or Why the Dalai Lama is a Marxist", GOOD magazine's Kira Goldenberg examines Western yoga's relationship to capitalism in "Bad Karma: Can Yoga and Capitalism Get Along?" The short answer to the title is no—not really—if you care about keeping the tenets of yoga intact. Goldenberg begins the piece, More »