Mindfulness

  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of December 31 Paid Member

    Happy New Year, everyone!  Over the holiday break, Tricycle was saddened to hear of a Christmas Day plane crash in Burma in which three Burmese died and the founders of the Community Meditation Center, Susanna Weiss and Allan Lokos, were injured. While Susanna suffered broken vertebrae in her back and has been released from the hospital, Allan, the center's guiding teacher and a frequent Tricycle contributor, received severe burns on his hands, legs, and head, and remains in the ICU of a hospital in Singapore. WNYC has the whole, harrowing story here. Please pray for the couple's health and swift recovery. More »
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    Buddhists Aim to Bring Mindfulness to the Ballot Box Paid Member

    (RNS) The mindfulness movement has seeped into Silicon Valley, Capitol Hill, and even the United States Military Academy at West Point. Next stop: the voting booth. A new California-based group wants the estimated 5 million Americans who practice mindfulness to move off their meditation cushions and into the polls on Tuesday (Nov. 6).  If meditation can calm hyperactive kids, ease the pain of drug addicts and tame the egos of Fortune 500 CEOs, it can surely help a stressed-out and polarized country choose a president, says the Rev. Angel Kyodo Williams. More »
  • Working with Mindfulness Paid Member

    Mirabai Bush is the co-founder of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society, an organization devoted to bringing contemplative practice into mainstream institutional life. Though its current focus is on higher education, Bush herself is known for her work at such corporate behemoths as Google, Monsanto, and Hearst Publications, where she has taught mindfulness training. Her most current work in the corporate landscape has been at Google alongside Chade-Meng Tan, a Google engineer, and Daniel Goleman, author of the book Emotional Intelligence, in developing an emotional intelligence, mindfulness-based course called Search Inside Yourself. More »
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    Smiling Mind Paid Member

    Smiling Mind, a new website and mobile app, is a mindfulness meditation program designed specifically with children and young adults in mind. Developed by an Australian nonprofit, Smiling Mind is available completely free-of-charge with registry.The program takes listeners through guided meditations, beginning with a "body scan" session and moving on to sounds, thoughts, and emotions—always returning to the ever-calming, grounding sensation of the breath. All meditations are presented secularly. More »
  • Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt Paid Member

    Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt is a new book from Parallax Press by landscape architect and author Zachiah Murray, with a foreword by Thich Nhat Hanh. Predicated upon the Zen conviction that the garden is a perfect place to practice mindfulness, the book offers a series simple short verses, called gathas, to assist us in cultivating deep awareness through the practice of gardening. The following excerpt begins the book. Entering the Garden Entering the gardenI see my true nature.In its reflectionmy heart is at peace. We cross many thresholds in our lives. Some thresholds are monumental—being born, learning to walk, starting school, graduating, getting our first job, losing our first job, getting married, giving birth, and dying. Other thresholds are subtle—moving from one room to another, passing through a gate, or crossing an intersection. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of September 3 Paid Member

    Water, water, everywhere, and not a drop to drink. These days when I read about Buddhism in the mainstream media—heck, when I read about Buddhism in the Buddhist media—it's more like, mindfulness, mindfulness, everywhere, and not a drop of dharma. It's not that I have anything against mindfulness. It's just that I can't jump on the mindfulness craze bandwagon because every time I read an article about so-called "mindfulness" I'm reminded of a visit that Thai forest monk and Pali expert Thanissaro Bhikkhu paid to the Tricycle offices a few months ago. While he was here, I asked him what Buddhist concept he thinks Western Buddhists most commonly misunderstand. He responded, "mindfulness." Oof. We are in trouble. More »