Mindfulness

  • Running with the Sakyong Paid Member

    Last week, the New Yorker caught up with Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, leader of Shambhala International, to speak about human integrity, mindfulness, and the benefits of jogging. "When you're running," says Rinpoche, "there's a real sense of bringing your mind into your body and relating to what's happening." It's time to speed up that walking meditation, we guess. More »
  • S. N. Goenka, Pioneer of Secular Meditation Movement, Dies at 90 Paid Member

    S. N. Goenka, leader of an enormously popular worldwide insight meditation (vipassana) movement, died on September 29 of natural causes in Mumbai, India. He was 90 years old. More »
  • The Art of Undermining your Significant Other Paid Member

    One of America’s most under-appreciated talents is the sheer genius of its married and unmarried couples in using the language and insights of therapy to destroy their relationships. Decades ago, when psychoanalysis was all the rage, husbands and wives found that throwing a few Freudian insights into their arguments gave both an air of authority to their dismissive judgments of each other and a death-dealing blow to the survival of a healthy relationship. If your parents knew any Freudian jargon, you may remember exchanges like this: More »
  • The Committee Paid Member

    The title of your new book is With Each and Every Breath: A Guide to Meditation. Why not the far more popular “mindfulness”? Probably because I’m a contrarian! Really, though, I wanted to put meditation in its larger context, and mindfulness is just one aspect of meditation. It’s not just about getting along better in your daily life; it’s also about your life as a whole. What’s really important to you? What’s not important to you? I’m teaching meditation as way to train the mind to find happiness in all situations and beyond all situations, to think about the higher levels of happiness that meditation can bring. More »
  • Thich Nhat Hanh's Meditation Flash Mob Descends on Manhattan Paid Member

    Last Friday, members of Thich Nhat Hanh's Blue Cliff Monastery brought a little mindfulness to Union Square. About 100 participants staged a "meditation flash mob" in the middle of the busy park, contrasting their frantic surroundings with complete silence. Facing five robed monks, the eclectic group of meditators sat silently for 30 minutes, as locals and tourists alike crowded around in wonder. After the sitting meditation, the group created even more of a stir when they began walking meditation up Broadway. New Yorkers' gazes were forced momentarily away from their smartphones and onto the slow-moving religious crowd, blocking their path on the sidewalk. The smartphones, of course, were then used to snap the necessary Instagram pictures. More »
  • Wrong Mindfulness Paid Member

    Hozan Alan Senauke is a Soto Zen priest, activist, and the former director of Buddhist Peace Fellowship. He is an advisor to the International Network of Engaged Buddhists and founder of the Clear View Project, which focuses on social change and relief efforts in Asia. He also happens to be an accomplished folk musician. In March, Radio host John Malkin interviewed Senauke on his show “The Great Leap Forward” on Free Radio Santa Cruz. The two spoke about the confluence of Buddhism and social justice, Buddhist Anarchism, and where Engaged Buddhism stands today.   More »