Mindfulness

  • What Does a “Conscious Workplace” Look Like? Paid Member

    What does a “conscious workplace” look like? This isn’t just a question we ask ourselves at a small, nonprofit Buddhist organization like Tricycle. Increasingly, as a society, mindfulness in the workplace is an idea we are exploring and embracing. With high-profile companies like Google investing in projects like their School of Personal Growth (see Joan Duncan Oliver's "Buddha in the Googleplex" from Tricycle's Summer 2009 issue) it’s clear that the concept has gone mainstream. This Wisdom 2.0 interview with Gopi Kallayil, part of the Search Advertising Product Marketing Team at Google, sheds a little light on the question: what does a “conscious workplace” look like? More »
  • Joan Oliver interviews Bernie Glassman on the Symposium for Socially Engaged Buddhism Paid Member

    From August 9th to 14th, 2010, the Zen Peacemakers will be hosting “The First Symposium for Western Socially Engaged Buddhism”, in Montague, MA.  It will be a gathering of leading Western activist practitioners, sponsors, and academics in this ever-important and growing field. Throughout the coming months, we at Tricycle will be posting a series of video interviews with prominent figures from the world of Socially Engaged Buddhism, beginning with this one with Bernie Glassman, who is a pioneer of the movement, founder of the Zen Peacemaker order, and co-organizer of the symposium. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Wisdom of the West Paid Member

    I think Westerners lack respect for their own spiritual maturity. It’s as though Asia owns spirituality, and we’re these barbarians, beseeching, “Oh, Bhante, please come over and tell us how to live.” But I’ve been to Asia, and they’re just as screwed up as we are. And there’s some real wisdom in our culture; the West has a tradition, too, of compassion and wisdom. And some people who aren’t even religious have it. When I was in Asia I totally did whatever an Asian lay person would do—I have the deepest respect for this tradition—but Asia does not have a monopoly on kindness. In Asia, being a lay person is—from the point of view of meditational practice—considered second-class. I personally think that the monastic life does optimize your possibilities for breaking through to awakening. But it’s by no means a guarantee. Most monasteries are hardly crammed full of enlightened people. But we need a teaching that addresses the lives we actually live. We do need to handle money. More »
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    A Crossed Wire: Sharon Salzberg in The Huffington Post Paid Member

    Sharon Salzberg, who is leading Tricycle's first online retreat, also found the time to pen this piece for the Huffington Post: "A Crossed Wire: A Call for Help." Here's a sample: I had a strange experience the other day. The landline in my NYC sublet had intermittently stopped working, for days on end. No dial tone, or a strange sound of static, or a faint message about a receiver being off the hook (I only have one.) I made many calls to Verizon, had periods of false hope only to see the phone go again, and ended up with the cell phone number of the repairman... Read the entire piece here. More »
  • Tips on Mindfulness Meditation from Sayadaw U Tejaniya Paid Member

    BEFORE WE START practicing mindfulness meditation, we must know how to practice. We need to have the right information and a clear understanding of the practice to work with awareness intelligently. This information will work at the back of your mind when you meditate. 1. Meditating is watching and waiting patiently with awareness and understanding. Meditation is not trying to experience something you have read about or heard about. 2. When meditating, both the body and mind should be comfortable. 3. You are not trying to make things turn out the way you want them to happen. You are trying to know what is happening as it is. Read the rest here. Image © sayadawutejaniya.org More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Mindfulness Leads to Wisdom Paid Member

    In a state of mindfulness, you see yourself exactly as you are. You see your own selfish behavlor. You see your own suffering. And you see how you create that suffering. You see how you hurt others. You pierce right through the layer of lies that you normally tell yourself, and you see what is really there. Mindfulness leads to wisdom. - Bhante Henepola Gunaratana, from “Mindfulness and Concentration,” Tricycle, Fall 1998 Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Read the full article: Mindfulness and Concentration More »