Mindfulness

  • "Abbey Dharma" on Politics: Respect Others' Opinions Paid Member

    I think that calling oneself a Buddhist implies a dedication to non-greed, non-hatred, and non-delusion—a dedication that certainly transcends political stance. It would be wonderful if our sanghas welcomed political diversity and used practices of skillful speech to explain our opinions to one another. In situations that do not feel combative to me, I can work collegially. I can modify my position to accommodate others. I can recognize situations in which an attachment to a particular view has kept me from realizing a larger truth. What if we, as Buddhists in communities, were a model for the world political community? Sylvia Boorstein, "Dear Abbey Dharma" (Summer 2010) Click here to to read the complete article. Sign up to receive Tricycle's Daily Dharma emails here. More »
  • Buddhism, Money, and the Recession: Where to Invest? Paid Member

    I recently came across an interview on the BBC website in which  Tibetan-Buddhist nun Lama Zangmo, living in London, speaks about the virtues of having no material possessions: More »
  • Meditation and Mindfulness with Ricky Williams Paid Member

    Ricky Williams was a two-time All-American and Heisman Trophy winner before exploding onto the scene in the National Football League in 1999. His early promise was dampened by fans' confusion with his eccentric behavior, not to mention a failed drug test or two. But despite the disappointments and uneven play over the years, Williams has remained a fan favorite and his smallest action makes headlines. So why isn't anyone coming to his meditation class? More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Working with Labels and Reactions Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. 8. Three objects, three poisons, and three seeds of virtue. More »
  • Meditators have more brains Paid Member

    Psychology Today reports on a study that indicates that meditators have more gray matter where it counts: A study published in NeuroImage presents findings by a group of researchers at UCLA who used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to scan the brains of meditators. The researchers report having found differences between the scans, showing that certain brain areas of the long-term meditator group were larger than those of the non-meditating control group. More »
  • Nalanda Benefit Paid Member

    If you’re in the neighborhood Wednesday evening (June 9)—and the interface of Buddhism and psychotherapy is your thing—Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science is hosting a panel discussion, “The Confluence of Two Streams: Buddhist Psychotherapy in the West,” at Tibet House in New York City. Participating are Nalanda’s founder and director, psychiatrist Joe Loizzo, and two other big names in the field, Paul Fulton, PhD, president of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and psychoanalyst Jeffrey Rubin, PhD, author of Psychotherapy and Buddhism. The conversation should be lively: moderating is Robert Thurman, the charismatic Columbia professor and president of Tibet House US. More »