Mindfulness

  • Awake at the Wheel Paid Member

    Last week, several Tricycle staffers traveled to Carmel, New York to visit the Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi at Chuang Yen Monastery. Sam Mowe describes it here and provides some visual aids. (The monastery was pretty mind-blowing.) But he left out the driving part. Carmel is a bit off the beaten path and it's easiest to get there with a car. I drove. I don't remember why but it was a bit like musical chairs: We were at the car rental place and everyone piled into the car and I was left outside and the only empty seat was the driver's. So exercising the millennia-old "driver's privilege" of controlling the radio, for the ride back I decided to pop in Awake at the Wheel: Mindful Driving with Michele McDonald, which we've had in the office for a little while, but, since we live in New York City, we haven't had much chance to put into practice. More »
  • What to do when mindfulness is not easy Paid Member

    The primary approach of mindfulness is to pay attention to what's happening and to develop a different relationship to our experience so that we're not rejecting it or hating it, but we're also not overwhelmed by it. So mindfulness has an inherent sense of balance. But the reality is that there are times when mindfulness is not that easy. We may be exhausted, or we may not be able to find balance through coming back to the breath, or mental noting, or other techniques we employ, or our mindfulness may be too intermittent. So there are a whole host of approaches to help us come back into balance and once again be mindful. It's fine to explore these methods instead of following a traditional mindfulness practice. Sometimes people think, "Oh, I blew it, I can't do the real thing." But it's not like that at all. More »
  • April Retreat: Sharon Salzberg on the Five Hindrances Paid Member

    Last week I had the privilege of attending some of the taping* of the April Tricycle Retreat: Sharon Salzberg on the Five Hindrances. The Five Hindrances are classically described as negative mental states that interfere with meditation. Sharon Salzberg in this retreat will speak of how they play out in our lives generally as well. They are translated in different ways, but generally speaking they are: craving, including attachment or clinging to sensual and other pleasures aversion, including anger and resntment sleepiness, inclduing boredom and laziness restlessness, including fear and anxiety doubt, lack of confidence and mistrust of the teachings More »
  • Thank you to Enkyo Roshi and Sharon Salzberg Paid Member

    Well, nothing lasts forever. This week, Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara's Tricycle Retreat, "Ease and Joy in Your Practice and Life," wraps up, as does the Tricycle Book Club discussion of Sharon Salzberg's book Real Happiness. Both events considerably brightened up an otherwsie gloomy February here at Tricycle! To both Enkyo Roshi and Sharon Salzberg, thank you very much for the gift of the dharma you've given us. Thank you for being available, generous, and patient throughout the month! A participant in the Week 4 discussion of the retreat put it beautifully: More »
  • Vast is the robe of liberation Paid Member

    Today we begin the fourth and final week of Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara's Tricycle Retreat, "Ease and Joy in Your Practice and Life." This week's teaching is called "The World is Vast and Wide," a reference to a well-known Zen koan. The discussion has already started this week, with a commenter discussing Roshi's experience on a homeless retreat of the type run by Bernie Glassman. The commenter says: More »
  • Wisdom 2.0 livestream begins today! Paid Member

    Can't make it to the Bay Area for this weekend's Wisdom 2.0 conference? No shirt, no shoes, no problem: You can watch the event live here. The Wisdom 2.0 Conference is a one-of-a-kind event that launched in Silicon Valley end of April, 2010, and brought together people from a variety of disciplines, including technology leaders, Zen teachers, neuroscientists, and academics to explore how we can live with deeper meaning and wisdom in our technology-rich age. The conference addresses the great challenge of our age: to not only live connected to one another through technology, but to do so in ways that are beneficial to our own well-being, effective in our work, and useful to the world. More conferences like it are currently in development. More »