Mindfulness

  • Thank you to Enkyo Roshi and Sharon Salzberg Paid Member

    Well, nothing lasts forever. This week, Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara's Tricycle Retreat, "Ease and Joy in Your Practice and Life," wraps up, as does the Tricycle Book Club discussion of Sharon Salzberg's book Real Happiness. Both events considerably brightened up an otherwsie gloomy February here at Tricycle! To both Enkyo Roshi and Sharon Salzberg, thank you very much for the gift of the dharma you've given us. Thank you for being available, generous, and patient throughout the month! A participant in the Week 4 discussion of the retreat put it beautifully: More »
  • Vast is the robe of liberation Paid Member

    Today we begin the fourth and final week of Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara's Tricycle Retreat, "Ease and Joy in Your Practice and Life." This week's teaching is called "The World is Vast and Wide," a reference to a well-known Zen koan. The discussion has already started this week, with a commenter discussing Roshi's experience on a homeless retreat of the type run by Bernie Glassman. The commenter says: More »
  • Wisdom 2.0 livestream begins today! Paid Member

    Can't make it to the Bay Area for this weekend's Wisdom 2.0 conference? No shirt, no shoes, no problem: You can watch the event live here. The Wisdom 2.0 Conference is a one-of-a-kind event that launched in Silicon Valley end of April, 2010, and brought together people from a variety of disciplines, including technology leaders, Zen teachers, neuroscientists, and academics to explore how we can live with deeper meaning and wisdom in our technology-rich age. The conference addresses the great challenge of our age: to not only live connected to one another through technology, but to do so in ways that are beneficial to our own well-being, effective in our work, and useful to the world. More conferences like it are currently in development. More »
  • The Weather is Just the Weather: Birth of a Tricycle Article Paid Member

    In late September 2010 I traveled by train to Cambridge, Massachusetts. As I passed through Rhode Island, bored, tired, hungry—all the small negatives that combined make travel a magical experience—I remembered some snippets of history, King Philip's War, William Blackstone leaving Boston on the back of a bull ("The Puritan court ordered his house burned down"), the birthplace of American industry, and so on, and read about it in fragments and snatches on my cellphone. More »
  • Real Happiness 28-Day Meditation Challenge, Day 23 Paid Member

    After sitting in the office today, I reflected on the past several days as a flurry of anticipations. Rarely do I realize how inundated my day-to-day life is with waiting. I am always in waiting—relentlessly—for the next thing—whatever it might be. These anticipations take all the colors of the rainbow—from desire for a new thing, stress about an upcoming interview, up to the noblest aspirations of helping another or cultivating my own positive qualities. Whatever it is that I’m waiting for, by the time it arrives (if it ever does), there is already another thing for which I sit in waiting.More »
  • Real Happiness 28-Day Meditation Challenge, Day 22 Paid Member

    I was looking forward to sitting in the office today. But when the time came my thoughts kept circling back to the various sex scandals whose echoes are ricocheting around the Zen community. It is depressing to think that we can't seem to keep sex out of the zendo. Articles like this from the New York Times make it seem like our lives are dominated by the sex instinct, no matter what our preferences are. So however civilized we may seem, we really haven't gone far at all from our days in the caves, the trees, the bottom of the ocean. Thanissaro Bhikkhu said: More »