Mindfulness

  • Q&A with Thirty-Year Vipassana Instructor Michele McDonald Paid Member

    Michele McDonald, who has been teaching vipassana meditation for thirty years, co-founded Vipassana More »
  • Mindfulness & Murder: A monastic mystery Paid Member

    Who dunnit? That's what Father Ananda, a cop-turned-Buddhist-monk, is trying to figure out in Irish-Thai director Tom Waller's new film Mindfulness and Murder (Sop Mai Ngib in Thai). From the Bangkok Post: Adapted for the screen and directed by Tom Waller, an Irish-Thai producer/filmmaker, the film is adding a new shelf in the menagerie of monk characters in Thai movies. Though not exactly a mind-twisting detective flick of the highest order, the film rides on a moody atmosphere, while its portrayal of the cloistered monastic existence—in good and bad ways—is honest and far from simply flattering. More »
  • Breath Meditation Instructions from Sharon Salzberg Paid Member

    Sharon Salzberg is now leading a Tricycle Retreat on The Five Hindrances, the five negative thought patterns that interrupt our practice (and life). The following meditation instructions are from pages 46-51 of her bestselling book Real Happiness: More »
  • Awake at the Wheel Paid Member

    Last week, several Tricycle staffers traveled to Carmel, New York to visit the Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi at Chuang Yen Monastery. Sam Mowe describes it here and provides some visual aids. (The monastery was pretty mind-blowing.) But he left out the driving part. Carmel is a bit off the beaten path and it's easiest to get there with a car. I drove. I don't remember why but it was a bit like musical chairs: We were at the car rental place and everyone piled into the car and I was left outside and the only empty seat was the driver's. So exercising the millennia-old "driver's privilege" of controlling the radio, for the ride back I decided to pop in Awake at the Wheel: Mindful Driving with Michele McDonald, which we've had in the office for a little while, but, since we live in New York City, we haven't had much chance to put into practice. More »
  • What to do when mindfulness is not easy Paid Member

    The primary approach of mindfulness is to pay attention to what's happening and to develop a different relationship to our experience so that we're not rejecting it or hating it, but we're also not overwhelmed by it. So mindfulness has an inherent sense of balance. But the reality is that there are times when mindfulness is not that easy. We may be exhausted, or we may not be able to find balance through coming back to the breath, or mental noting, or other techniques we employ, or our mindfulness may be too intermittent. So there are a whole host of approaches to help us come back into balance and once again be mindful. It's fine to explore these methods instead of following a traditional mindfulness practice. Sometimes people think, "Oh, I blew it, I can't do the real thing." But it's not like that at all. More »
  • April Retreat: Sharon Salzberg on the Five Hindrances Paid Member

    Last week I had the privilege of attending some of the taping* of the April Tricycle Retreat: Sharon Salzberg on the Five Hindrances. The Five Hindrances are classically described as negative mental states that interfere with meditation. Sharon Salzberg in this retreat will speak of how they play out in our lives generally as well. They are translated in different ways, but generally speaking they are: craving, including attachment or clinging to sensual and other pleasures aversion, including anger and resntment sleepiness, inclduing boredom and laziness restlessness, including fear and anxiety doubt, lack of confidence and mistrust of the teachings More »