Meditation

  • Balancing Emotions: Second Week of Segyu Rinpoche's Retreat Paid Member

    In this week's retreat teaching, Balancing Emotions, Segyu Rinpoche of the Juniper School shows us how to practice analytical meditation. By using it to develop awareness of our emotional patterns and triggers, we can begin to transform our inner habits and lead a more balanced emotional life. Rinpoche breaks down analytical meditation into a four-phase process: familiarity, reasoning, application to our lives, and insight, which becomes the object of our concentration. He also introduces us to a way of reframing our emotional vocabulary by going through the Juniper School's five emotional scales of assertiveness, contentment, realism, compassion, and self-value. Through practicing analytical meditation, he says, we can "dismantle that story, that structure, which has that component that leads us into affliction, leads us into suffering, leads us into stress." More »
  • Meditation Month, Day 28: You Happy Lucky Idiot Paid Member

    Meditation month is wrapping up, and though I'm pretty sure I've achieved nothing, I have—I hope—developed some insight into "real happiness." The most pronounced of these is the insight that real happiness isn't so great. In fact, for anyone with half an imagination, it's opposite ("fake happiness," "conventional happiness"?) is far superior. While conventional happiness is filled with bouts of joy and connection, not to mention endless congratulations, awards and achievements, Cold Beer and Beautiful Girls, real happiness has something to do with sustained attention and—can't forget—accords with reality. More »
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    Sitting in Wartime Paid Member

    Be mindful of the passing of time, and engage yourself in zazen as though saving your head from fire. —Dogen, 13th-century Japanese Zen master Eyes closed, the body comes into focus. I feel the touch of the ground beneath my sitting bones, the touch of my hands resting on crossed legs. The breath takes over; layers of the mind unfold. But today, on the threshold of the cave of consciousness, the walls of the cave—my body—grab hold. It is as if the vrittis (the whirling of thought and emotion) are embedded in the flesh itself. The skin, the muscle, the organs, the bones pulsate, calling me back. Look at me, my body says. Stay with me. Yes, watch me. Keep me safe. More »
  • Let's Get Real Paid Member

    The Wisdom 2.0 conference, a four-day gathering of the Silicon Valley crowd to address the intersections of spirituality, mindfulness, and technology, took place this past weekend. Author and conference attendee Jay Michaelson blogged his experiences at the summit here on the Tricycle blog throughout the weekend. Today's post covers the last day of the conference, which was yesterday. Let’s Get Real More »
  • Meditation Month, Day 22: Buddhist Black Sheep Paid Member

    I'm my family's Buddhist black sheep. When I decided to go to Nepal some years ago to study at a Tibetan Buddhist shedra, my parents and most of my friends, none of whom are particularly religious, thought I was nuts. Granted, they were entertained—never have my Facebook statuses, which mostly centered around monks playing badminton with me, been so popular—but no one took it very seriously. When I came back from Nepal and my loved ones noticed that I was, as a matter of fact, very serious about Buddhism, I was treated to a series of lectures about what my friends and family viewed as the worrisome trend of my declining ambition. (Actually, that's putting it a lot more eloquently than it was in reality. It was more of a derisive, "What are you going to do, Emma? Be a Buddhist as a career?") More »