Meditation

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    Meditating Monks Ignore Earthquake Paid Member

    An earthquake rocked L.A. yesterday, fortunately causing little damage. It managed to scare the usually unflappable Judge Judy, but a group of monks meditating at a Thai temple were unfazed. A meditator was also shown to have special insight in problem-solving according to the New Yorker. Hat tip: the good folks at Thanissaro Bhikkhu's Metta Forest Forest Monastery. And it seems someone is saying meditation can slow HIV. Most of this article is behind a free registration link. More »
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    Change Your Mind Day 2008; 3-year retreat; Jodo Shu Research Institute Paid Member

    Change Your Mind Day: Two videos featuring Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara of New York City's Village Zendo up on YouTube, from 2007 and 2008. More videos here. Back into the world after a three-year retreat in France. More »
  • Burmese Still Lack Aid Paid Member

    A month after the storm, hundred of thousands of Burmese still have received no aid. Moe than 69,000 people have died in the earthquake in China's Sichuan province, and because many of the survivors did not have insurance (or the right kind of insurance) they're finding themselves out in the cold. And more on incense being bad for your lungs. More »
  • After the Quake, Fingers Point at Beijing Paid Member

    An estimated 10,000 children died in the earthquake in Sichuan province in China, and aftershocks are still echoing through the region. In one school with 900 children near the epicenter, only 13 students emerged alive. Parents have become angry at the shoddy construction used in China's school and in the government's reaction in general. And now rivers that have been dammed by debris from the quake and turned into growing lakes threaten many more people. The Burmese government and their media is softening their stance toward allowing aid donors into affected areas. More »
  • The Biological Boon Behind Incense Paid Member

    A new study reveals one reason why incense and spiritualism go together like zendos and zafus. Beyond the symbolic tradition of burning incense lies a biological benefit: it can help ease anxiety and depression. When scientists administered incensole acetate, a compound found in incense, to mice, the compound affected them in "brain areas known to be involved in emotions as well as in nerve circuits that are affected by current anxiety and depression drugs." Adds Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, "This study also provides a biological explanation for millennia-old spiritual practices that have persisted across time, distance, culture, language, and religion--burning incense really does make you feel warm and tingly all over!" Read all about it over in Science Daily. More »
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    "The still point of the turning world" Paid Member

    Meditation and art. More »