Meditation

  • Who's the happiest man in the world? Paid Member

    According to an opinion piece by Daniel Goleman in this morning's New York Times ("Sitting Quietly, Doing Something"), Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche is. And the reason is no secret: So how did he get that way? Apparently, the same way you get to Carnegie Hall. Practice. Buddhist meditation practice, that is. According to Goleman, Mingyur Rinpoche is an "Olympic-level meditator," logging more than 10,000 hours on the cushion. Goleman cites neuroscientist Richard Davidson's studies on meditation's effect on the brain to explain why these spiritual athletes are so cheerful. There is a strong correllation, Goleman explains, between committed meditation practice and increased activity in the areas of the brain associated with positive moods: The more lifetime hours of practice, the greater the increases tended to be. More »
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    Daily Dharma, July 16th, 2009 - Attention to Breathing Paid Member

    Traditionally, in the meditation instructions handed down from the Buddha, attention to breathing is understood as part of the overall practice of mindfulness of body. Sit here and feel the body breathing in (however short or long the breath, let it be that way) and breathing out (don't try to make the breath deeper or longer, just let it be however it is). Gaylon Ferguson, Natural Wakefulness (Shambhala Publications) Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
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    Overcoming Anxiety Paid Member

    I understand that long-term meditation is supposed to help squash more quickly those moments of anguish that arise, but for those of us– the vast majority, I imagine– who are not advanced practitioners, how do we handle the regular hiccups in life that threaten to cause damage? How do we manage our anger when someone elbows us on the street? Or when someone close to us treats us poorly? Or simply when that unexplainable bubble of anxiety rises in our throats? When you can’t just stop and meditate, what do you do? More »
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    How to BE HERE NOW? Paid Member

    I was moved by a line in an otherwise shallow, mainstream blockbuster film that I watched last eve (the title shall rename nameless to protect the insipid and homogeneous). “Just close your eyes and let the water carry you.” It’s a phrase not uncommon to our anxiety-ridden, multitasking, future-planning selves, though it’s advice we often don’t really own, even as we try to practice mindfulness and being-present-in-the-moment. Still, the advice stands to serve us well. Many of us seem to be constantly plotting our next move- or, as the case seems to be in New York City, all of our moves several weeks out, when we might, instead, be focusing our efforts on the here and now. More »
  • More on mindfulness & Buddhism Paid Member

    A few days back I blogged about a Washington Post article that discussed mindfulness's uses in dealing with diseases like cancer ("It's mindfulness but is it Buddhism? Does it matter?"). Given the number of comments and a few mentions on other blogs (our friend the Rev. Danny Fisher's, to name one), I invited B. Alan Wallace to comment. More »