Meditation

  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    Daily Dharma, August 11th, 2009 - What is Meditation? Paid Member

    Meditation, simply defined, is a way of being aware. It is the happy marriage of doing and being. It lifts the fog of our ordinary lives to reveal what is hidden; it loosens the knot of self-centeredness and opens the heart; it moves us beyond mere concepts to allow for a direct experience of reality. Meditation embodies the way of awakening: both the path and its fruition. More »
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    Daily Dharma, August 10th, 2009 - Disillusionment Paid Member

    Sometimes people feel that recognizing the truth of suffering conditions a pessimistic outlook on life, that somehow it is life-denying. Actually, it is quite the reverse. By denying what is true, for example, the truth of impermanence, we live in a world of illusion and enchantment. Then when circumstances change in ways we don’t like, we feel disappointed, angry, or bitter. The Buddha expressed the liberating power of seeing the unreliability of conditions: “All that is subject to arising is subject to cessation. Becoming disenchanted one becomes dispassionate. Through dispassion the mind is liberated.” It’s telling that in English “disenchanted,” “disillusioned,” and dispassionate” often have a negative connotation. But looking more closely at their meaning reveals their connection to freedom. Becoming disenchanted means breaking the spell of enchantment, waking up into a greater and fuller reality. This is the happy ending of so many great myths and fairy tales. More »
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    Can meditation be bad for you? Paid Member

    Newspapers and magazines are full of stories about the positive effects of meditation practice, so it was only a matter of time before we'd begin reading about about its perils. The Vancouver Sun's Douglas Todd writes today that New York psychoanalyst Micheal Eigen and philosopher Ken Wilbur, both meditators, express concern about meditation's potential ill effects. Can contemplative practice feed our narcissism and mask serious problems? Can it cut us off from our feelings and cause us to lose touch with others? After reading Eigen's book, The Psychoanalytic Mystic (1998), the Vancouver Sun's Douglas Todd has been inspired to ask: More »
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    Norman Fischer: "For the Time Being" Paid Member

    The New York Times hosts a blog called "Happy Days," and Buddhists have been turning up there lately. This isn't surprising. As the Times explains, it's about the "search for contentment": The severe economic downturn has forced many people to reassess their values and the ways they act on them in their daily lives. For some, the pursuit of happiness, sanity, or even survival, has been transformed. Happy Days is a discussion about the search for contentment in its many forms — economic, emotional, physical, spiritual — and the stories of those striving to come to terms with the lives they lead. More »
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    Blasphemous reading material Paid Member

    Upon finishing a recent retreat overseas, I found myself with a day to kill in London. After attending the requisite West End theater production and wandering along the Thames, the thought of a six-hour flight prompted me to pick up a book. Stepping into an overpriced Borders lookalike, I walked straight to the psychology section and picked up The Freud Reader, edited by Peter Gay. Whether ironically or expectedly, the retreat itself motivated this purchase (which I had already been planning covertly for several days). Sitting with a large group of my fellow sufferers for a week affirmed more than anything the futility of efforts to escape reality with pious discipline, though I think that's what we were all secretly hoping for. More »
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    Daily Dharma, August 3rd, 2009 - When is the Perfect Time to Practice? Paid Member

    The perfect time to practice is right now—not tomorrow or next week or when you're less busy, but right now. Nothing is lacking now: The dharma is wide open. All the "if-onlys" in the world are just excuses that keep you from meeting this moment. - Dairyu Michael Wenger, Tricycle Winter 2004 More »