Meditation

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    As natural as breathing - Daily Dharma, September 23rd, 2009 Paid Member

    In order to communicate very openly with the world, you need to develop fundamental trust. This kind of trust is not trusting “in” something, but simply trusting. It is very much like your breath. You do not consciously hold on to your breath, or trust in your breath, yet breathing is your very nature. In the same way, to be trusting is your very nature. To be trusting means you are fundamentally free from doubt about your goodness and about the goodness of others. – Dr. Jeremy Hayward, from “First Thought,” Tricycle, Spring 1995 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Awakening is not the same thing as Bliss Paid Member

    There may be bliss with awakening, because it is actually a by-product of awakening, but it is not awakening itself. As long as we are chasing the by-product of awakening, we will miss the real thing. - Adyashanti, from “Bliss is a By-Product,” Tricycle, Summer 2009 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Warrior Mind: A new weapon for US soldiers Paid Member

    Does meditation have a place in the military? A recent article in Time magazine examines Warrior Mind Training, an increasingly popular program for US armed forces that centers on meditation exercises. Already offered at 11 military institutions, the Army plans to use the meditation program to train over 1 million soldiers in the art of mental toughness. Spearheaded by Sarah Ernst, the Warrior Mind Training program has been designed specifically for members of the military: Ernst and her colleagues researched the military mindset, consulting with veterans who had practiced meditation on the battlefield and back home. More »
  • Lama Surya Das on Why We Sit Paid Member

    In meditation we seem to be sitting by ourselves, but we do not sit just for ourselves. By focusing our attention on the breath, the body, thoughts, feelings, and sensations, or any other facet of our experience in meditation, we become more mindful—not mindless—through the transformative power of moment-to-moment alertness and presence of mind. Instead of absentmindedly stumbling through life like sleepwalkers, we can use contemplative practice to achieve extraordinary insight into ourselves and the world in which we live; to inhabit and appreciate more fully the here and now; to free our minds and open our hearts, and to relax into our natural state. The cultivation of mindfulness helps us wake up to things as they are rather than as we would like them to be. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Meditation: the new trend? Paid Member

    An article appearing in yesterday's Boston Globe suggests a new trend among young adults: meditation. Taking a break from the demands of Facebook and Twitter, young people are increasingly turning to meditation workshops and retreats to combat stress and refocus their attention. Institutions offering meditation classes, such as Insight Meditation Center (IMS) in Barre, Massachusetts, have seen a steady rise in the number of young adult applicants in the past few years. As Globe contributor Nandini Jayakrishna reports: Meditation groups say an increasing number of young adults are signing up for retreats and classes, seeking a temporary escape, a haven to reconnect with their thoughts. “Young people are much more stressed out than people 20, 30 years ago,’’ said Rebecca Bradshaw, one of the retreat leaders who also works as a psychotherapist. More »
  • Become Aware of Awareness Paid Member

    The goal of attention, or shamatha, practice is to become aware of awareness. Awareness is the basis, or what you might call the “support,” of the mind. It is steady and unchanging, like the pole to which the flag of ordinary consciousness is attached. When we recognize and become grounded in awareness, the “wind” of emotion may still blow. But instead of being carried away by the wind, we turn our attention inward, watching the shifts and changes with the intention of becoming familiar with that aspect of consciousness that recognizes Oh, this is what I’m feeling, this is what I’m thinking. As we do so, a bit of space opens up within us. More »