Meditation

  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Meditation on Display Paid Member

    As the holiday season fast approaches, one Manhattan store's window display may attract more attention than usual. On November 6th and 7th the Interdependence Project (IDP), a NYC meditation group, will host a 24 hour marathon meditation sit in the store front windows of a downtown interior design store, ABC Carpet & Home. The initiative, headed by IDP founder Ethan Nichtern, aims to bring awareness to the value of meditation in Western Culture and raise funds for IDP. The meditation event, under the slogan "Change Your Mind to Change the World," will be open to the public: Nichtern will be joined by one hundred IDP members who will meditate in rotation throughout the 24 hours. Introductory meditation classes will also be taught free of charge throughout Saturday by venerable teachers, including Roshi [Pat Enkyo] O’Hara and Dr. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Just This Much Paid Member

    Full attention is both an activity of learning and the actualization of unconditional love. It is this selfless, choiceless love that heals the illusion of separateness, brokenness, and alienation, yielding a gratification, faith and confidence not dependent on external or internal conditions beyond our control. Practice-Life is the dynamic activity of bringing full attention to what is presenting itself most clearly in the awareness for as long as it is there, and with deepening simplicity and joy, knowing Just This Much! –Douglas Phillips, from “On the Cushion: Q & A with Douglas Phillips,” Tricycle, Spring 2003 Read the full article: On The Cushion: Q & A with Douglas Phillips More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind in the Tricycle Community Book Club Paid Member

    The Tricycle Community Book Club is discussing Shunryu Suzuki Roshi's timeless classic, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind. Zoketsu Norman Fischer, former abbot of San Francisco Zen Center, founded by Suzuki Roshi, introduced the book, and will be stopping by to check in on us from time to time. You need to be a member of the Tricycle Community to participate, but joining is easy, and free! More »
  • What is the Right Way to Sit? Paid Member

    Different Buddhist schools recommend a variety of meditative postures. Some emphasize a still, formal posture, while others are less strict and more focused on internal movements of consciousness. Tibetan traditions, for instance, advise an upright spine, erect but relaxed; hands at rest in the lap, with the belly soft; shoulders relaxed, chin slightly tucked, and the gaze lowered with eyelids half shut; the jaw is slack with the tongue behind the upper teeth; the legs are crossed. A Soto Zen Buddhist saying instructs us to sit with formal body and informal mind. The common essential point is to remain balanced and alert, so as to pierce the veil of samsaric illusion. –Lama Surya Das, from “The Heart of Buddhist Meditation,” Tricycle, Winter 2007 Read the full article: The Heart of Buddhist Meditation More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Just Be Paid Member

    Just sitting means just that. That “just” endlessly goes against the grain of our need to fix, transform, and improve ourselves. The paradox of our practice is that the most effective way of transformation is to leave ourselves alone. The more we let everything be just what it is, the more we relax into an open, attentive awareness of one moment after another. Just sitting leaves everything just as it is. –Barry Magid, from “Leave yourself alone!” Tricycle, Summer 2005 Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Practice is not something we do; it is something we are Paid Member

    Our lives, like the ocean, constantly change, and we will naturally face great storms and dreary lulls. How, then, to put our minds in a space where practice is always there, whether tumultuous or in the doldrums? It requires a completely radical view of practice: practice is not something we do; it is something we are. We are not separate from our practice, and so no matter what, our practice is present. An ocean swimmer is loose and flows with the current and moves through the tide. More »