Japan

  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    oxherding at Japan Society Paid Member

    Artists Max Gimblett and Lewis Hyde Present Ten Oxherding Pictures Remixed oxherding October 1, 2010–January 16, 2011, at Japan Society New York, NY – Celebrated New York painter Max Gimblett partners with author Lewis Hyde for oxherding, a fresh, American take on the Ten Oxherding Pictures, a venerated Buddhist parable from 12th-century China. Running October 1, 2010, through January 16, 2011, oxherding shows in tandem with Japan Society's major fall exhibition The Sound of One Hand: Paintings and Calligraphy by Zen Master Hakuin. Read more here. More »
  • A Day for Bodhidharma Paid Member

    You can learn a lot of things perusing the Treeleaf Zendo message boards, including that today is Bodhidharma Day. What do we do on Bodhidharma Day? We sit, in order to honor the Zen ancestor who brought Zen from India to China. Bodhidharma is usually presented a bad-tempered barbarian who sat facing a wall meditating for nine years. In order to always stay awake, he cut off his eyelids, and tea plants sprang from them where they landed. Yum! Here are some Bodhidharma Day recipes. If you're in China, you could visit the recently unearthed Bodhidharma Stupa. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    The Sound of One Hand at Japan Society Paid Member

    National Touring Exhibition and First U.S. Retrospective Illuminates the Art and Life of Preeminent Zen Master Hakuin The Sound of One Hand: Paintings and Calligraphy by Zen Master Hakuin October 1, 2010 – January 9, 2011 at Japan Society Gallery New York, NY — What’s the sound of one hand clapping? This famous meditational question was first framed as “What is the sound of one hand?” by Hakuin Ekaku, an 18th century painter and Zen master whose work is showcased at Japan Society from October 1, 2010 to January 9, 2011 in The Sound of One Hand: Paintings and Calligraphy by Zen Master Hakuin. “Although a major figure in Japanese art and widely regarded as the most important Zen master of the last 600 years, Hakuin is virtually unknown to American audiences today—a situation Japan Society intends to redress with this, the first retrospective of his work ever to be seen in the United States,” says Joe Earle, Director of Japan Society Gallery. More »
  • Japanese pop art Buddha sculpture causes stir at Versailles Paid Member

    A recent art installation at the Versailles Palace is causing a stir among the French. Pieces of sculpture Takashi Murakami's modern artwork---including the 18-foot "Oval Buddha"---are set to appear in a two-month exhibition entitled Murakami Versailles that will fill the rooms of the World Heritage site. The exhibit, which opened this week, has protesters who don't believe that Japanese Pop Art has a place on the palace grounds. Via the Japan Times: There are many who fail to see the link between the splendour of France's royal palace and the manga-inspired work of Takashi Murakami and, as the Japanese provocateur prepares to unveil a controversial exhibition of his sculptures, the stately calm of the chateau has been disrupted by an unseemly row over contemporary art. More »
  • Makeup made their children stupid Paid Member

    Did heavy makeup bring down the shogunate? It's possible. Remains of children of samurai show sky-high levels of lead in their bones, most likely from their mothers, who adorned their faces with white, lead-based powder. Idiocy was apparently epidemic among the Edo-era shogunate, with lead levels far above those associated with intellectual impairment. This may have had political consequences, according to an an MSNBC report, which cites the research of Tamiji Nakashima, an anatomist at the University of Occupational and Environmental Health in Kitakyushu: More »