• Vast is the robe of liberation Paid Member

    Today we begin the fourth and final week of Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara's Tricycle Retreat, "Ease and Joy in Your Practice and Life." This week's teaching is called "The World is Vast and Wide," a reference to a well-known Zen koan. The discussion has already started this week, with a commenter discussing Roshi's experience on a homeless retreat of the type run by Bernie Glassman. The commenter says: More »
  • The Dharma Gate of Ease and Joy Paid Member

    How many of us can describe out meditation sessions as "joyful"? That is the challenge Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara lays out for us in Week 1 of her Tricycle Retreat, "Ease and Joy in Your Meditation and Life." Joy, Roshi says, has "a leaping quality." But before we reach these heights, we must find a place of peace and ease in our meditation. That is what this retreat is about. Below is a two-minute preview of the Week 1 teaching, which is called "The Dharma gate of Ease and Joy." To watch the entire Week 1 teaching, you must be a Tricycle Community member. To watch all four videos of the retreat, you must join the Tricycle Community at the Supporting or Sustaining level.   More »
  • New York Times reviews the Hakuin show at Japan Society Paid Member

    Check out The New York Times art review of “The Sound of One Hand: Paintings and Calligraphy by Zen Master Hakuin” at Japan Society.
From Ken Johnson’s review, “Spiritual Seeker With a Taste For the Satirical”: More »
  • Bonnie Myotai Treace, Sensei on the Art and Calligraphy of Hakuin at Japan Society Paid Member

    Bonnie Myotai Treace, Sensei gave a teaching recently at New York City's Japan Society. Her topic was the art and calligraphy of Hakuin, in particular the image, "Nin," at right. Myotai is the guiding teacher of the Hermitage Heart sangha in Garrison, New York. The Hakuin exhibition continues at Japan Society until January 16th, at which it will go to New Orleans Museum of Art from February 12th to April 17th, 2011, and from there to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, from May 22nd to August 17th, 2011. The show is stunning: if you'll be in southern Louisiana or southern California when it's around, don't miss it. Leading up to the Japan Society event, which took place December 4th, Myotai wrote the following: More »
  • Sento-kun: Half-Deer, Half-Buddha Boy Paid Member

    A couple of years ago, Sento-kun, a half-deer, half-Buddha boy mascot, was chosen to represent the 1,300th anniversary of Japan's ancient capital being relocated to Nara. At first, the baby-faced boy with antlers (the deer is considered a sacred animal in Nara) was not well-received. Many found it ugly and disrespectful toward Buddha. Now, however, Sento-kun—designed by Satoshi Yabuuchi, a sculptor and professor at Tokyo University of the Arts—is being praised by Nara authorities for the amount of attention that he has brought to the city. More »
  • Buddhist Monk wins gold medal for horseback riding in Asian Games Paid Member

    Last weekend a Japanese Buddhist monk named Kenki Sato won the "eventing individual" gold medal at the Asian Games held in Guangzhou, China. After winning Sato discussed how his Buddhist practice "gels" with his love for horseback riding and his dream to eventually compete in the Olympic Games. From The Chakra report: According to Sato, horse riding “gels well with Buddhism” and thus he has been horse riding since the age of 7. He said that Buddhism is so important to him that he tends to naturally get attracted to activities that other Buddhist monks also take part in, which includes horse riding. He takes both horse riding and being a monk very seriously. More »