Japan

  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist History in Danger Paid Member

    Sad news from the Maldives this week, an islands-nation that lies southwest of India. The Maldives, though now strictly Islamic, was Buddhist until the 12th century. In recent political turmoil, during which the first democratically elected president in the country's history resigned (he says he was forced to), six men entered the National Museum and smashed almost 30 Buddhist statues, some of which were over 1,500 years old. A New York Times article reports on the loss:   More »
  • Buddha Buzz: E-blessings, Art, and Ceasing to Be Human Paid Member

    Buddhism and modernity have sat down together at the table once more. Last Friday, the China Daily published the article "Buddhist temple offers e-blessing service," which covered one innovative method of controlling crowds, reducing the burning of incense, and making some money: sending blessings via text. Guiyuan Temple in Wuhan, China, in cooperation with China Mobile, is charging people 3 to 10 yuan (normal text messages, according to the article, cost 0.15 yuan) to send a blessing text, which includes the phone number of the person for whom the blessing is meant for. While China Mobile forwards the text to the appropriate person, the blessing appears on an LED board outside the temple, where monks are chanting prayers for all the texters and textees. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Remembering Jane Imamura Paid Member

    Other Friday evenings found Whalen and Snyder in Berkeley for the study group with Rev. Kanmo Imamura and Jane Imamura at the Berkeley Buddhist Temple. Together the Imamuras were descended from the most important old families of Jodo Shinshu Buddhism, yet they welcomed the young men, going so far in the subsequent years as to turn their little church publication—the Berkeley Bussei—over to the artist Will Petersen for a time. Snyder, Whalen, Ginsberg, and Kerouac all published early poems in its pages. The benevolent Imamura family gave both Snyder and Whalen their first contact with people actually practicing Buddhism instead of purely discussing its philosophies and traditions. —David Schneider, from "Lives Well Shared: The Friendship of Philip Whalen and Gary Snyder" More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Dating, Drugs, and Death Paid Member

    First off, Happy Lunar New Year! Welcome to the year of the dragon. As befits such a year celebrating a creature who is often associated with longevity, some Buddhist monks in Japan have a similar concern in mind: from the Japan Times, "Matchmaking Service gives Buddhist monks a boost in dating market." From the article: In Japan, it is typical for relatives of monks—especially head monks—to inherit caretaker duties of their temples. But because of a lack of successors, the monks have become desperate to find wives in order to preserve this tradition and save their temples from being closed or integrated. More »
  • Bonnie Myotai Treace, Sensei to teach at NYC's Japan Society Paid Member

      Bonnie Myotai Treace, Sensei, is coming to teach at NYC's Japan Society! In March and April, she will be leading a six-week workshop called "Exquisite Way: Japanese Aesthetic Principles and Zen Practice." The workshop will cover zazen instructions for any Zewbies (that's Zen newbies), and will then discuss the following: More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Buddha Buzz: Monsters, Vampires, and Ghosts, Oh My! Paid Member

    Happy (late) Halloween! Did you dress up? Did you go trick 'r treating (or take your kids)? Did you...use Halloween to further your Buddhist practice? At first it seems like Halloween might be the antithesis of Buddhism. I know when I was a kid Halloween was the best excuse in the year to flex my greed-and-attachment muscles. All that candy was just too much for me to handle... But John from The Dharma Folk blog had a great post yesterday called "The Dharma of Trick or Treating," in which he talks a bit about how "Halloween secretly teaches awesome Buddhist principles." He continues, More »