Interview

  • Tricycle Talk with UPenn Professor Justin McDaniel Paid Member

    Today's Tricycle Talk is with Justin McDaniel, a Religious Studies professor at the University of Pennsylvania. A former Buddhist monk who identifies as both a Buddhist and a Catholic, he's got a Buddhist-related academic background of champions: a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Sanskrit and Indian Studies, also from Harvard. More »
  • The Most Organized Man in America Paid Member

    As promised in last week's Tricycle Talk with Andrew Mellen, today we have for you a video teaching with the most organized man in America. Think the state of your living space isn't connected to your Buddhist practice? Think again. Watch Mellen work his magic on my desk below—and see me cower under the principles of the organizational triangle. The video is full of advice on how to approach cleaning your own living space, so best of luck in your own organizational endeavors! I'm happy to report that in the two weeks since my desk got organized that it is still...almost as clean. (What can I say? Like spiritual practice, staying organized requires both diligence and the formation of new habits. And that doesn't happen all at once, you know!) We hope you enjoy watching, and let us know if you'd like to see more Tricycle videos! More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Practice for Young American Buddhists Paid Member

    This is part three of a three-part guest blog series by Charles Prebish, Emeritus Professor of Religious Studies at Pennsylvania State University and Utah State University. In the current issue of Tricycle, Prebish is interviewed by Linda Heuman (read "Pursuing an American Buddhism" here), but they had so many topics to cover in such a short time that there were many items Prebish would have liked to discuss more fully. Last week we featured "Scholar-Practitioners in American Buddhism." Join the discussion of this blog post, and the two others, on the interview page. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: The Cult's Ian Astbury and Some Hard Partyin' Monks Paid Member

    It's Friday the thirteenth (paraskevidekatriaphobics, beware) and what better way to celebrate than with an interview with "smash-and-grab Buddhist" Ian Astbury, veteran grunger and bandmember of The Cult? As the interview begins on the Huffington Post, "It might be argued that the visceral whack of The Cult's brand of heavy, dharma-conscious rock is just the kind of Zen stick a sleepy pop culture needs administered to its backside." I missed the fan cult of The Cult back in the 80s, so I can't really throw in my opinion on this. But we don't have to take the interviewer at his word: we have YouTube! Here's The Cult performing "She Sells Sanctuary" and perhaps whacking you with their dharma-conscious Zen music stick:   More »
  • Tricycle Talk with Professional Organizer Andrew Mellen Paid Member

    Spring for me is always the same. Come March, the flowers are blossoming, the birds are chirping, and the grumpy New Yorkers around me are glaring with slightly less menace. Everything is a little brighter and a little warmer. With the feeling of newness wafting in the air, I finally drudge up enough courage to look around at the mess I've made all winter long and clean. Spring cleaning! It always starts so well. But in an hour I'm quite like the Mole in the first page of Kenneth Grahame's book The Wind in the Willows: More »
  • Scholar-Practitioners in American Buddhism Paid Member

    This is part two of a three-part guest blog series by Charles Prebish, Emeritus Professor of Religious Studies at Pennsylvania State University and Utah State University. In the current issue of Tricycle, Prebish is interviewed by Linda Heuman (Read "Pursuing an American Buddhism" here), however, they had so many topics to cover in such a short time there were many items Prebish would have liked to discuss more fully. Last week we featured "Precepts as Practice in American Buddhism." Join the discussion of this blog post, and the two others, on the interview page. More »