• Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Bodhisattva Work Paid Member

    The Buddhist Peace Fellowship (BPF) was founded by Robert Aitken Roshi, his wife Anne, and Nelson Foster on the back porch of Aitken Roshi's Maui Zendo in 1978. The idea was to further interdependent practice of awakening and social justice, and BPF promotes these ideals to this day. Over the course of time, as BPF grew and established chapters all over the United States, it found the need for a newsletter as a means of communicating between the national office and the BPF chapters. This was the humble beginning of what came to be known as Turning Wheel magazine, what is now known as Turning Wheel Media. More »
  • Tricycle Talk: Juniper's Lawrence Levy on Buddhist Training for Modern Life Paid Member

    This week's Tricycle Talk features Lawrence Levy, co-founder of the Juniper school. Levy, former chief financial officer at Pixar, took an early retirement to focus on  Juniper's work of rendering traditional Gelug teachings in modern idiom. A close friend of Steve Jobs, Levy enlisted the support of Apple's legendary founder in developing the Juniper school's aesthetic and presentation. Juniper  is led by Segyu Rinpoche, whom Tricycle interviewed earlier this year. For information on Juniper's upcoming retreat, click here. More »
  • The Future of Religion Paid Member

    You might have seen it mentioned in last Friday's Buddha Buzz that there's a new interview between Stephen Batchelor and Don Cupitt over at the Secular Buddhist Association website called "The Future of Religion: A Dialogue." Tricycle printed its own dialogue between America's #1 Buddhist Atheist (that's Stephen) and Anglican priest Don Cupitt back in 2003 that you can read here. This new conversation between the two, which originally occurred in London in May, is extremely interesting but rather a lot to wade through. Here's a small excerpt—if it piques your interest, make sure to head on over to the Secular Buddhist Association website to read the conversation in its entirety. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    The Angry Buddhist Paid Member

    Seth Greenland is the author of The Angry Buddhist, a recently published novel set in the Californian desert that explores corruption, deception, murder, politics, and...Buddhism. Jimmy Duke, one of the book's (many) main characters, is an ex-cop whose struggle with anger issues leads him to study Buddhism with an Internet teacher called "DharmaGirl." The dramedy met with such success in France and the United States (read the New York Times' review here) that it was picked up by Showtime to turn into a TV series, which is currently in development. More »
  • Interview with Tibetan Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman Paid Member

    The first American to have been ordained a Tibetan Buddhist monk, Robert A.F. Thurman, Ph.D., has been a personal friend of the Dalai Lama for over 40 years. The New York Times has recognized him as "the leading American expert on Tibetan Buddhism" and Time magazine named him as one of the “25 Most Influential Americans.” He is co-founder and president of Tibet House U.S., a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Tibetan culture and civilization, and is president of the American Institute of Buddhist Studies. Dr. Thurman has translated many Sanskrit and Tibetan Buddhist texts, and is the author of 16 books on Tibet, Buddhism, art, politics and culture. He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard in Sanskrit Indian Studies, taught at Amherst College, and is now a professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies at Columbia University. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    The Mindful Manifesto Paid Member

    Mindfulness isn't just for Buddhists anymore; you can find it in hospitals, schools, prisons, and in some of today’s largest corporations. It is being used to help people quell their cravings, find emotional balance, eat healthier, and even to fall asleep at night. All of these things are well and good, of course, but there's a question worth considering: Is anything lost when we remove mindfulness meditation from a Buddhist context? More »