Interview

  • Working with Mindfulness Paid Member

    Mirabai Bush is the co-founder of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society, an organization devoted to bringing contemplative practice into mainstream institutional life. Though its current focus is on higher education, Bush herself is known for her work at such corporate behemoths as Google, Monsanto, and Hearst Publications, where she has taught mindfulness training. Her most current work in the corporate landscape has been at Google alongside Chade-Meng Tan, a Google engineer, and Daniel Goleman, author of the book Emotional Intelligence, in developing an emotional intelligence, mindfulness-based course called Search Inside Yourself. More »
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    The Torah of Nonviolence Paid Member

    Rabbi Lynn Gottlieb is no stranger to controversy.  Dubbed the “Radical Rabbi” by some who view her peace work with Iran and Palestine to be anti-Israel, she most recently made headlines in the Jewish community when President Obama included her on his six hundred-strong list of rabbis who had signed on to support his campaign. As one of the first ten women to become a rabbi and the first woman ordained as a rabbi in the Jewish Renewal Movement, she has long been an advocate for Jewish feminism. In 1974 she founded a Jewish feminist theater troupe called Bat Kol (literally, “daughter of a voice”), and in 1995 authored the book She Who Dwells Within: A Feminist Vision of a Renewed Judaism. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of September 17 Paid Member

    Here's a fun fact: the Tricycle offices in New York are in the same building as a club owned by the rapper Jay-Z. Usually, it doesn't mean much. No one is at work at 3 am on a Friday, which is presumably when the club is—excuse me for using this word—hoppin'. But this Monday Jay-Z and his wife Beyonce hosted a fundraiser for President Obama in the club, and the Tricycle staff were sent home early by what we presume were the Secret Service's orders. Because nothing is more threatening to the President's safety than a bunch of Buddhists typing furiously on their computers. More »
  • New Interview with Nicholas Vreeland: Monk, Photographer, Abbot Paid Member

    Tricycle's Fall 2012 issue features the stunning, black-and-white photos of Nicholas Vreeland: a monk, professional photographer, and newly-appointed abbot of Rato Dratsang monastery. (He also happens to be the grandson of fashion icon Diana Vreeland.) The first Westerner to be appointed abbot of a Tibetan monastery, H.H. the Dalai Lama told him upon his appointment that "his special duty was to be a bridge between the Tibetan tradition and the Western world." Born to diplomat parents in Geneva, Switzerland, and subsequently dividing his childhood among Germany, Morocco, and the United States, Vreeland is a unique bridge, indeed. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Buddhist News from Around the World, Week of September 3 Paid Member

    Water, water, everywhere, and not a drop to drink. These days when I read about Buddhism in the mainstream media—heck, when I read about Buddhism in the Buddhist media—it's more like, mindfulness, mindfulness, everywhere, and not a drop of dharma. It's not that I have anything against mindfulness. It's just that I can't jump on the mindfulness craze bandwagon because every time I read an article about so-called "mindfulness" I'm reminded of a visit that Thai forest monk and Pali expert Thanissaro Bhikkhu paid to the Tricycle offices a few months ago. While he was here, I asked him what Buddhist concept he thinks Western Buddhists most commonly misunderstand. He responded, "mindfulness." Oof. We are in trouble. More »
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    Bodhisattva Work Paid Member

    The Buddhist Peace Fellowship (BPF) was founded by Robert Aitken Roshi, his wife Anne, and Nelson Foster on the back porch of Aitken Roshi's Maui Zendo in 1978. The idea was to further interdependent practice of awakening and social justice, and BPF promotes these ideals to this day. Over the course of time, as BPF grew and established chapters all over the United States, it found the need for a newsletter as a means of communicating between the national office and the BPF chapters. This was the humble beginning of what came to be known as Turning Wheel magazine, what is now known as Turning Wheel Media. More »