Interview

  • Mark Epstein on Maya Devi Paid Member

    After writing a Mother’s Day blog post about Maya Devi, I couldn’t stop thinking about the fact that she dies so shortly after giving birth to the Buddha. Isn’t this sad? We usually think about the Buddha’s early life as being protected from suffering, that he “would not be troubled by cold or heat, dust or grit or dew…” (Rupert Gethin, The Foundations of Buddhism, translated from the Anguttara Nikaya), and yet he suffers a profound loss when he’s just a week old. Mark Epstein has been doing some deep thinking on the Buddha’s mother and touched on her death in the recent PBS documentary The Buddha. Earlier this week I was fortunate enough to chat a little with Mark about Maya Devi. Interview with Mark Epstein More »
  • Joan Oliver interviews Bernie Glassman on the Symposium for Socially Engaged Buddhism Paid Member

    From August 9th to 14th, 2010, the Zen Peacemakers will be hosting “The First Symposium for Western Socially Engaged Buddhism”, in Montague, MA.  It will be a gathering of leading Western activist practitioners, sponsors, and academics in this ever-important and growing field. Throughout the coming months, we at Tricycle will be posting a series of video interviews with prominent figures from the world of Socially Engaged Buddhism, beginning with this one with Bernie Glassman, who is a pioneer of the movement, founder of the Zen Peacemaker order, and co-organizer of the symposium. More »
  • Earth Day: The World Without Us Paid Member

    Happy Earth Day to all! May all beings wake up to the beauty and gravity of our planet! More »
  • Roderick Whitfield Discusses Buddhist Cave Art Paid Member

    As reported by the American Museum of Natural History, As goods and people traveled along the Silk Road, many passed through the oasis city of Dunhuang, China, home to incredible caves that contain a treasure trove of Buddhist art. Roderick Whitfield, professor of Chinese and East Asian art and head of the Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art at the University of London, will discuss some of these fascinating cave murals on March 31 at the Museum. He recently answered a few questions on the subject. Why are the caves near Dunhuang so important today? What can we learn from them? More »
  • The self exists, it's just not as real as you think. Paid Member

    If a basic principle in Buddhism is non-self (anatta), is it incompatible with psychotherapy, which seems to be all about finding and understanding the self? The question is a little misguided, and in an ABC News NOW segment Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein explains why: The self exists, it's just not as real as you think it is. You can watch the interview here. More »
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    Daily Dharma: Does Compassion Come Naturally? Paid Member

    Q: Doesn’t it come to us naturally that it’s in our self-interest to extend compassion to those beyond our local groups? A: No, it doesn't. Because to worry about what some disenchanted Muslim teenager in Pakistan is feeling right now does not come naturally in the sense of visceral response. It does, however, make intellectual sense; the world is moving to a point where, if only out of self-interest, we need to think about that person. One virtue of some of the religious traditions is that they have well-worked-out procedures for assisting this intellectual process. In other words, it's one thing to realize logically that my fate is intertwined with the fate of Muslims around the world: If they're unhappy, they'll eventually make me unhappy. But it's another to feel it, to look at someone and get a deep sense of fraternity with them. That's where religious practice plays an important role. More »