Interview

  • Tricycle Talks: Patrick Groneman, Executive Director of the Interdependence Project Paid Member

    Welcome to our second Tricycle Talk: our new audio interviews with Buddhists of note. Today Tricycle Editorial Assistant Emma Varvaloucas speaks with Patrick Groneman, the Executive Director of the Interdependence Project (IDP). Not familiar with IDP or their work? Listen to the interview below to hear about IDP's mission, their experiences meditating at Occupy Wall Street's Zuccotti Park, and whether bearing witness at protest sites is a truly effective social activism tool. As Groneman says in the interview, it is important to examine your own intention when meditating in public: More »
  • My Buddha Is Pink: Q & A with blogger Richard Harrold Paid Member

    Our blogger series went on a brief hiatus, but now it's back! Today we have an interview with Richard Harrold, the blogger behind My Buddha Is Pink. I'm a big fan of the blog because I love the way Harrold seriously contemplates texts from the Pali Canon in almost every post but gives them his own twist at the same time. In a post called "Are You Too Sexy for Your Body?" for example, Harrold cites the Majjhima Nikaya Atthakatha: More »
  • Video: Unlearning Meditation Paid Member

    We're currently reading Jason Siff's Unlearning Meditation: What to Do When the Instructions Get In the Way at the Tricycle Book Club. For the next four weeks, Siff will be providing you with articles, meditation instructions, and most significantly, an opportunity for you to journal your meditation sittings and look more closely at what happens in meditation. Below are Siff's basic meditation instructions for “recollective awareness meditation.” Pick up a copy and join the discussion. More »
  • One Size Doesn't Fit All: An Interview with Patricia Mushim Ikeda Paid Member

    The current issue of Tricycle features three essays by members of the Tricycle Community who, in different ways, don't fit the stereotypical image of what a Western Buddhist looks like ("Lifting a Corner"). One of the three contributors is Patricia Mushim Ikeda, a Buddhist teacher, author, mentor, and community activist. In her essay, "Not What I Thought," Mushim describes an incident at a Thai Buddhist temple in Chicago in the mid-eighties where the bhikkhus declined to invite her to meditate because she was a woman. From there she goes on to reflect on the diversity of North American Buddhism, as well as her place in it. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Rhinoceros Extinction and Ngondro Day Paid Member

    The rhinoceros has been a part of Buddhist practice and literature since the Pali Canon's Khaggavisana Sutta, nicknamed the Rhinoceros Sutta. In it, practitioners are encouraged to "wander alone like a rhinoceros," although the translation has been the subject of some controversy. You can read the entire sutta here, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu on Access to Insight. As Buddhism made its way across cultures and countries, the rhinoceros came with it, most notably in koan practice. For instance, read "Roshi Meets Rhino," a 1993 article by Janwillem van de Wetering in which he wrestles with the koan, "Roshi meets Rhino: where did Roshi go?" More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    My Reincarnation: Interview with the Film's Star Khyentse Yeshi Paid Member

    Our Winter 2011 issue is here and with it came Mary Talbot's review of My Reincarnation, a film recently released in New York and Los Angeles. The film, by documentarian Jennifer Fox, features over twenty years of footage of Tibetan-born Dzogchen master Chögyal Namkhai Norbu and his Italian-born son Yeshi. As Talbot writes, More »