Interview

  • Wrong Mindfulness Paid Member

    Hozan Alan Senauke is a Soto Zen priest, activist, and the former director of Buddhist Peace Fellowship. He is an advisor to the International Network of Engaged Buddhists and founder of the Clear View Project, which focuses on social change and relief efforts in Asia. He also happens to be an accomplished folk musician. In March, Radio host John Malkin interviewed Senauke on his show “The Great Leap Forward” on Free Radio Santa Cruz. The two spoke about the confluence of Buddhism and social justice, Buddhist Anarchism, and where Engaged Buddhism stands today.   More »
  • How to Change the World Without Getting Really Depressed Paid Member

    We all want to change the world, but we can quickly run up against despair, and worse, come to harbor the idea we can't make any difference whatsoever. In his new book from School of Life, How to Change the World, author and journalist John-Paul Flintoff offers examples of people who have done just that, and how they were able to do so. The fact is, whether we acknowledge it or not, we are all making a difference all the time. Flintoff implores us to be more conscious of that impact so that we may produce the effects we desire. Tricycle caught up with Flintoff via email to ask a few questions about the new book and how to overcome self-imposed obstacles to meaningful social change.   More »
  • The World is Places: Extras from the Current Issue of Tricycle Paid Member

    For every interview or feature that appears in the pages of Tricycle, there sits a pile of editorial content on the cutting room floor that didn't make the final version. But that's what the Internet is for, no? In the current issue of Tricycle, former editor Sam Mowe speaks with religious studies scholar Jeff Wilson about the relationship between place and religion—where we're from, where we've been, and where we are now has a greater effect on our practice, Wilson says, than we often realize. Below is an exchange that didn't make it into the printed interview. You can read the full conversation, "The World is Places," here. More »
  • On Meditation: An interview with filmmaker Rebecca Dreyfus Paid Member

    Rebecca Dreyfus is the director of the forthcoming film series On Meditation, which documents the inner journey of meditation through portraits of practitioners from a variety of traditions. The team has so far filmed the Venerable Metteya, Hatha yoga teacher Elena Brower, author and Zen practitioner Peter Matthiessen, actor Giancarlo Esposito, and mindful congressman Tim Ryan. Filmmaker David Lynch is slated next. Known for her feature-length documentary Stolen, Dreyfus was inspired to film On Meditation by a curiosity about other people’s practices and a desire to cultivate her own. Tricycle spoke to Dreyfus earlier in the week by email about the impetus behind the film series and the challenges of depicting an inward-turning practice on film. More »
  • Genocidal Buddhists Paid Member

    In 2007, inspiring images of Burmese Buddhist monks leading their compatriots in demonstrations of civil resistance flooded the Western media. Just five years after the series of protests curiously referred to as the “Saffron Revolution” (Burmese monks wear maroon robes, not saffron-colored ones), Buddhist-led violence erupted in the western Rakhine state. Following a monk-led campaign against the Rohingya Muslim minority of Burma, recognized by the UN as one of the most persecuted minorities in the world, reports of rioting, killing, and the blocking of humanitarian aid to the Rohingya surfaced here and there in the media, devoid of the enthusiasm that the Burmese monks attracted back in 2007. More »
  • How Buddhist Nuns Are Fighting Human Trafficking in Nepal Paid Member

    The following interview was previously published at Stories Untold: Interviews and Synthesis by Erik Campano on Patheos.com, and is adapted here with permission. Recently Patheos has been putting the spotlight on American evangelical Christians’ efforts to fight human trafficking, as well as the critique from some academics that these efforts amount to the wrongful imposition of Protestant values on “rescued victims” (in quotes because both are controversial terms). There deserves to be, however, a broader range of conversations about trafficking that widens the lens beyond American Christian anti-trafficking work to include efforts in other countries undertaken by other faith traditions. More »