Humor

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Buddhist Humor Online: Buddhisthumor.org Paid Member

    At an event in the Tricycle office several hundred million years ago, Tricycle editor James Shaheen posed a question to the throngs of devas, nagas, goblins, demons, and bodhisattvas (numbering eighteen million in all) in attendance: "What would you like to see more of in the pages of Tricycle?" From the back of the room, a young man of good family known by some as Lama Surya Das called out bravely, "More humor!" Lo, he was not obliged (or if he was, it was just barely.) Today, billions of years after this auspicious gathering of one hundred and eighty million bodhisattvas and Pratyekabuddhas, longtime Tricycle readers will recall the humorous writings of P. B. Law, who has contributed such pieces as "Bodhisattva in the Rye" and "Winnie-the-Buddhist" over the years. More »
  • Getting something out of your Zen practice Paid Member

    A "Bodhi cartoon" by artist Brian Howlett. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Boy Believed To Be Next Reincarnation Of Regional KFC Manager Discovered In Chatfield, MN Paid Member

    OK, the institution of reincarnation is officially part of the mainstream imagination—it was in the Onion More »
  • Zen Is Right Here Paid Member

    I recently came across the book Zen Is Right Here on one of our bookshelves.  It is a collection of short stories and anecdotes about Zen master Shunryu Suzuki.  The pieces are rarely longer than a paragraph each. Some are quite profound while others are just plain funny.  I started carrying it with me and sneaking quick reads here and there. Here are a few examples, A student asked in dokusan, "If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does it make a sound?" Suzuki Roshi answered, "It doesn't matter." *** More »
  • Why we fight online Paid Member

  • Take a virtual tour of Coyote Man's home Paid Member

    If you've ever picked up a copy of Tricycle you've probably seen Coyote Man, artist Neal Crosbie's recurring coyote cartoon. Over the years we've followed Coyote Man past pine trees, up Mt. Fuji, over land on horseback and on foot, and even onto the face of a dollar bill. Now we can track him from the moment of creation---in Crosbie's California studio. The ink painter's website now offers a virtual tour of Coyote Man's home, check out the video here here. As for Coyote Man's creator, here's the news from his neck of the woods: Lately besides painting pictures of clouds and pine trees, I've been singing songs which are unsteady and short. Songs in gratitude to the Buddhas and songs of apologies to the salmon. More »