History

  • Buddhism and Conflict Resolution Paid Member

    As many of you know, Tricycle sends out a daily email called Daily Dharma, containing short teachings and links to longer articles from the Tricycle Archives.  A few months ago we received a very thoughtful response to a Daily Dharma from an author and security specialist named Michael Jaquish, which we published here on the blog, leading to a very interesting and dynamic discussion on Buddhism and Faith. We recently heard from Michael again, this time in the topic of conflict resolution, and I am once again very thankful to be able to share his thoughts with our readers.  We thank him for this contribution, and welcome all of our readers’ responses to Daily Dharma as well. Here is the Daily Dharma, The causes of any conflict lie in strong attachment to certain views, and More »
  • The Indian-Chinese Rivalry Paid Member

    China's "assertiveness" in regional disputes, particularly Tibet, is causing disquiet among the member nations of ASEAN (The Association of Southeast Asian Nations). ASEAN is now looking into territorial disputes in the South China Sea: Although Tibet was never mentioned as part of the dispute in the South China Sea, and the Chinese position over its sovereignty is both very clear and undisputed by all attending ASEAN nations and observers, it is obvious that China’s 60 year old assertiveness towards regional disputes has reached a plateau. Buddhism is still a strong influence in many ASEAN member countries and the plight of the Dalai Lama, while not officially recognized or discussed, still causes regional discomfort. Add to that skirmishes with Vietnam in 1979, and still ongoing border disputes over Tibetan territorial claims with India, and China’s position as asserting more regional sovereignty is now starting to be questioned. Neither India nor China is a member of ASEAN, but the two countries are wrestling for influence in southeast and central Asia and are the elephants in the room at ASEAN discussions. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Hiroshima, 65 years later Paid Member

    Sixty-five years ago today, the B-29 superfortress Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb, code-named "Little Boy" over Hiroshima, Japan, killing 140,000 people. Here's what we wrote last year on this solemn occasion. This year a representative of the US government attended the commemoration ceremony for the first time. The U.S. is currently pursuing two wars, with civilian casualties everyday. Today is a day to hope and work for peace. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    800 years later, Nalanda University is Back Paid Member

    Nalanda University was big time. Right outside Rajgir, or Vulture’s Peak in the northeastern Indian state of Bihar, in its prime it had over 10,000 students, 2,000 staff, and denied 80% of its applicants. It would be hard to overstate how big time it was, and not just in Buddhist history. Dating back to the fifth century, it was one of the first institutions of higher learning in the world. Scholars came from all over the world to study philosophy, medicine, astronomy, and other subjects. Today it lies in ruins. There are plans, however, to revive the ruins and return Nalanda to its former glory as an active center of learning. Well, actually, the plan is to build a new Nalanda—while retaining the spirit of the original—next to the physical ruins. Andrew Buncombe, reporting for the Independent, writes: More »
  • The Teacher-Student Relationship Paid Member

    I recently picked up Alexander Berzin's book Wise Teacher, Wise Student: Tibetan Approaches to a Healthy Relationship. The topic is a crucial one for Buddhism and one that has been much on my mind lately. I was familiar with Berzin's writing, and I knew this was one of his themes (he wrote a Tricycle article called "Practical Advice Regarding Spiritual Teachers" some time ago) but the new book seemed very familiar. More »