Health

  • Buddhist meditation boosts concentration skills Paid Member

    According to a recent study published in the July 2010 issue of Psychological Science Buddhist meditation can boost concentration skills. The study, conducted by psychologist Katherine A. MacLean, PhD, and associate researchers from the University of California, Davis, focused on a group of 60 participants with an average age of 49. The participants were sent on three-month retreats where they studied meditation techniques with Buddhist scholar and co-researcher Alan Wallace, PhD, of the Santa Barbara Institute for Consciousness Studies. All the participants had been on meditation retreats before, but this time they were taught to concentrate and asked to complete concentration tests. From WebMD: More »
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    Actual Tomatoes Paid Member

    I'm growing tomatoes on my balcony. The latest development is actual tomatoes! This one got redder and was joined by two others. There are several in various stages of green-orangeness. The main problem with the overall plant's growth is lack of superstructure. Next summer I'll get one of those green wire fences to give the vines something to cling to (see the wooden stake, found on the street downstairs, as part of a feeble attempt to provide same.) More »
  • Are Tibetans superhuman? Paid Member

    How is it that Tibetans thrive at 13,000 feet, where those of us born closer to sea level get sick? Scientists now think that Tibetans have evolved while most of the rest of us have stood still: Recent research shows that Tibetans, who have lived isolated in these high altitudes for thousands of years, enjoy a genetic variation that keeps their hemoglobin levels in a normal range. A variation of EPAS1, a gene that is sometimes associated with increased athleticism, causes an enzymatic change in the way oxygen binds to blood and is transported around the body. Compared to lowland Chinese, Tibetans thrive in high altitude—they do not suffer from chronic altitude sickness and their children are born with normal weight. More »
  • Chronic pain? There's hope. Paid Member

    I've heard plenty about meeting pain with meditation, and there's a whole book about it—or many, but this latest book is one I may read in preparation for old age. Author Tim Parks, inspired by a A Headache in the Pelvis, a book by two Stanford urologists who recommend meditation, decided to give it a try. And—drum roll—it worked; his chronic pelvic pain was significantly alleviated. According to tomorrow's Irish Times: It took about three months to lower the levels of pain to such an extent they were no longer a problem, he says. More »
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    This is Getting Old by Susan Moon Paid Member

    I'm in the middle of reading Susan Moon's new book This is Getting Old: Zen Thoughts on Aging with Humor and Dignity—and you should be, too! It's the subject of the Tricycle Community Book Club's new discussion. Susan Moon's book is by turns hilarious, thought-provoking, and deeply moving. Aging is about as universal a topic as it gets, no matter how deep our denial is! More »
  • Things to consider as your parents age Paid Member

    Tricycle contributing editor Katy Butler recently interviewed Jeff Bridges for our upcoming August issue, and, as frequent visitors to our site know by now, you can watch Jeff and Bernie Glassman shooting the breeze in our two-part online interview. More »