• The Great Matter Paid Member

    The Great Matter is Tricycle’s blog on death and dying by contributing editor Sam Mowe.Medical technology has gotten so good at keeping people alive, we’ve forgotten how to die. This forgetting has happened with the best of intentions—namely, we want to preserve life because it is precious and fleeting. But because so many of us are stuck in this mentality of trying to postpone death through medical miracles, we often miss unique opportunities for insight and connection at the end of life.  More »
  • (Meta)Physical Education Paid Member

    After finishing my yearly spiel about rules this morning—the one in which I talk about participation and commitment, about how the work that we do in gym is similar to the work that we do in the classroom, and that even though we may not always like it, completing this work will challenge us, and make us better athletes, teammates, and disciples of Michelle Obama—Amanda, a feisty third grader, remarked, “Great speech, Alex.” I didn’t want to laugh. Laughing would indicate to her classmates that undermining your teacher with a well-timed sarcastic comment is acceptable behavior. But in the battle between laughing and being teacherly, laughter always seems to win. When a student pokes a needle into the inflated balloon of your own gravitas, it’s hard to remain serious. More »
  • When Science Met Buddhism Paid Member

    Being Human in a Buddhist World By Janet Gyatso Columbia University Press, 2015 544 pp., 51 illustrations; $45.00 (Cloth) More »
  • A Gleeful Foreboding Paid Member

    It’s strange how much modern people secretly crave weather-related disasters—the blizzard that shuts down a city, bringing travel and commerce to a halt, the tropical storm that knocks out power, leaving millions in the dark. People of earlier centuries rightly feared such events and earnestly prayed to be delivered from them. Now there's an excitement that begins building the moment we hear of such a storm.  More »
  • 12 Things You Should Never Say to the Sick Paid Member

    Even the most well-intentioned people often don’t know how to talk to the chronically ill. This is because we live in a culture that treats illness as unnatural. As a result, people have been conditioned to turn away in aversion from those who aren’t healthy, even though it’s a fate that will befall everyone at some point in his or her life.  The consequences of taking this unrealistic view of the realities of the human condition is that many people feel uneasy and even fearful when they encounter people who are struggling with their health. I admit that this was true of me before I became chronically ill. Now I find it as natural to talk to people who are chronically ill as I do to people who are the pinnacle of health.  More »