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  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Enough talk, it's time to save the whales—again. Paid Member

    This blog has been full of whale talk lately, and whatever our differences, I think most of us agree that it's time to do something to save our mammalian kin. I've just received this and want to share it with you—the Whaling Commission is to hold a final vote to legalize commercial whale hunting, and here's your chance to do something about it. Or, read the letter from avaaz.org below and help them meet their goal of garnering one million signatures (as of this writing, they are at over 900,000): Dear friends, More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Remember that you will die Paid Member

    As a compliment to their Summer exhibit entitled "Remember That You Will Die: Death Across Cultures," the Rubin Museum---in partnership with online magazines Killing the Buddha and Obit Magazine---is sponsoring an essay contest under the same name. Participants are encouraged to visit the Rubin's exhibit---or peruse the online photo gallery---and then write an article inspired by what they have seen. From the Rubin's website: More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Yeats's Birthday Paid Member

    Since yesterday was Bloomsday I thought today would be a good day to commemorate another Irish writer who was interested in Buddhism for a moment, though the moment was admittedly brief. Sunday was William Butler [W.B] Yeats’s birthday. One the books that first sparked Yeats’s interest in spirituality was about esoteric or Vajrayana Buddhism. He read D.T. Suzuki’s Essays in Zen Buddhism and received every copy of the journal Eastern Buddhist until his death. While Buddhism never featured prominently in his poetry or plays, his works were deeply shaped by Irish folklore, mysticism, and religious traditions. These poems helped forge a sense of Irish national identity in the years before the revolution.  His 1892 poem, 'The Lake Isle to Innisfree' begins: More »
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    Russian envoy: No visa for Dalai Lama Paid Member

    The Dalai Lama had planned to visit Russia, where three republics—Kalmykia, Buryatia and Tuva—have significant Buddhist populations. According to phayul.com: Taking a U-turn from his reported affirmation of Dalai Lama’s visit to Russia, Russian ambassador to India, Alexandr Kadakin has assured China that the Tibetan leader will not be granted visa... More »
  • Happy Bloomsday! Paid Member

    All of the narrative action in James Joyce's monsterpiece of a novel Ulysses takes place on a single day—June 16, 1904—to commemorate the day that Joyce met his wife, Nora Barnacle. Today, fans of the book celebrate that date as Bloomsday. More »
  • The 1918 Shikoku Pilgrimage of Takamure Itsue Paid Member

    In 1918 Takamure Itsue, an energetic young Japanese woman, traveled alone to the island of Shikoku to go on pilgrimage—the famous Shikoku pilgrimage, which follows the footsteps of the Buddhist saint Kobo Daishi. The route is approximately 1400 kilometers and consists of 88 temples. During her journey Takamure wrote 105 newspaper articles about her experiences, and these were later turned into a book: Musume Junreiki (The pilgrimage journal of a young woman). Susan Tennant, who lived and taught in Japan for 11 years including 5 years on the island of Shikoku, has recently self-published an English translation of this book entitled, The 1918 Shikoku Pilgrimage of Takamure Itsue. More »