General

  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Consider the Lobster… as a symbol Paid Member

    David Foster Wallace would have been proud.* A couple of weeks ago, a group of Tibetan Buddhists bought and released 534 lobsters into the Atlantic ocean. The group traveled from the Kurukulla Center in Medford to Gloucester, MA to purchase the lobsters from a seafood wholesaler on August 3, this year's Wheel-Turning Day on the Tibetan lunar calendar.Heart-warming stuff, right? Sounds like the kind of story that People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) would eat up.Not quite. And, on second thought, maybe DFW wouldn't have been so proud.** As PETA points out in an open letter to the Buddhists, by buying the lobsters from a seafood merchant they're supporting the lobster industry and perpetuating the cycle of catch and eat (even if in this instance the lobsters get to live a little longer, it's likely a cycle of catch and re-catch). More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Ecosattvas, enlightenment, and Aung San Suu Kyi Paid Member

    When Mara asks the Buddha to produce a witness to confirm his enlightenment, the Buddha touches the earth. Why? Because buddhas are earthly beings and, being spiritually awake, they can see that all of life is in cahoots. "Why the Buddha Touched the Earth," a recent piece at the Huffington Post, by John Stanley and David Loy explores this idea. Arguing that we have a responsibility to protect our earth through "sacred activism," Stanley and Loy introduce the idea of the "ecosattva." (Not to be confused with Clark Strand's "Green Bodhisattva.") More »
  • Buddha Buzz: stories, stories, and more stories Paid Member

    In a recent piece for The Telegraph, Tim Stanley wrote about his time in Hollywood. The article itself isn't particularly enlightening, but he did say something about Buddhism and personal narratives that I thought was worth noting: More »
  • What the Water Knows Paid Member

    In honor of World Water Day, here's a poem by Sam Hamill from the pages of Tricycle: What the Water Knows What the mouth sings, the soul must learn to forgive. A rat’s as moral as a monk in the eyes of the real world. Still, the heart is a river pouring from itself, a river that cannot be crossed. It opens on a bay and turns back upon itself as the tide comes in, it carries the cry of the loon and the salts of the unutterably human. A distant eagle enters the mouth of a river salmon no longer run and his wide wings glide upstream until he disappears into the nothing from which he came. Only the thought remains. Lacking the eagle’s cunning or the wisdom of the sparrow, where shall I turn, drowning in sorrow? Who will know what the trees know, the spidery patience of young maple or what the willows confess? More »
  • Toni Bernhard at the Tricycle Book Club Paid Member

    The Tricycle Book Club is currently reading How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and their Caregivers by Toni Bernhard (Wisdom Publications, 2010, $15.95 paper, available in all e-book formats). Foreword by Sylvia Boorstein. Bernhard has been actively participating in the discussion of How to Be Sick all this week, and she'll be here through the end of next week as well. Here is an exchange between Bernhard and a book club member: More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    10/10/10 Global Work Party Paid Member

    Happy 10/10/10 everybody! From everything we're hearing, today might be the largest day of protest the planet has ever seen. People are working toward climate crisis solutions at thousands of events going on today in 188 countries. Learn more at 350.org. Image: Back issues of Tricycle magazine form "350." Scientists say that 350 parts per million CO2 in the atmosphere is the safe limit for humanity. More »