food

  • An Angry Zen Chef on How to Cook Your Life Paid Member

    Ed Brown—former student of Suzuki Roshi and author of the Tassajara Bread Book—has practiced both Buddhism and cooking for over 40 years. This does not mean, however, that he's always equanimous in the kitchen. In fact, in a profile a couple years back, Slashfood called Brown the "Angry Zen Chef." How did he earn this nickname? By being unafraid to share and talk about his emotions—which at times can include a little anger, especially when people get in his way in the kitchen. More »
  • The Meat Question Paid Member

    Note: This post was originally published on July 19, 2010 More »
  • The Ethics of Farming Animals Paid Member

    The way I see it, there are two ways to think about the ethics of meat eating. One is to look at the suffering of each individual animal that is killed for consumption. The other way is to take a global approach, where one is concerned with negative environmental/human consequences caused by the meat industry. Of course, you don't have to choose one over the other, it just seems worthwhile to make a distinction. With this distinction in mind I'd like to call attention to a recent piece by George Monbiot in The Guardian that argues that much of the human malnutrition connected to the meat industry could be alleviated most effectively by changing the system in which animals are farmed. The author, a longtime proponent of veganism, had some of his assumptions challenged by the book Meat: A Benign Extravagance by Simon Fairlie. From "I was wrong about veganism. More »
  • Dinner, Quick & Mindful Paid Member

    If you're wondering what to cook up for Labor Day, our favorite chef, Wil Crutchley, has the answer: Sweet Potatoes with Black Bean Salad. We asked Wil to provide us with something healthy, environmentally conscious, affordable—and quick. And he delivered, and will every quarter. So take a look, and if you prepare it for yourself, let us know what you think. Click here for the recipe. You'll also find tips on where to buy the ingredients. Image: Ron Reeves More »
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    Lessons from the Alms Round - Daily Dharma Paid Member

    The alms round itself is a gift that goes both ways. Daily contact with lay donors reminds the monastics that their practice is not just an individual matter. They are indebted to others for the opportunity to practice, and should do their best to practice diligently as a way of repaying that debt. Furthermore, walking through a village early in the morning, passing by the houses of the rich and poor, the happy and unhappy, gives plenty of opportunities to reflect on the human condition and the need to find a way out of the grinding cycle. For the donors, the alms round is a reminder that the monetary economy is not the only way to happiness. It helps keep a society sane when there are monastics infiltrating the towns every morning, embodying an ethos very different from the dominant monetary economy. More »