Film

  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Oh My God, the movie Paid Member

    This November director Peter Rodger will debut "Oh My God," a documentary film of his global quest for God. Filmed in 23 countries, from Guatemalan jungles to the mountains of Ladakh, Rodger's film includes interviews with Catholic Priests, Rabbis, Christian Fundamentalists, Hindu Swamis, Zen Masters, Muslim radicals, and Buddhist Lamas, to name a few, not to mention a host of high profile celebrities. More »
  • Exclusive interview with Nati Baratz, director of "Unmistaken Child" Paid Member

    The Fall issue of Tricycle—coming to a newsstand or mailbox near you soon—features a review of the film Unmistaken Child and a short interview with the filmmaker. Below is a lightly longer version of the same conversation, and here's a list of showimes for the film. The film has garnered attention for its unsparing account of the wonders as well as the difficulties of the tulku system. A young monk searches for the reincarnation of his deceased master and finds him in a small boy. The boy is then removed from his family and entered into a life of devotion to the dharma. More »
  • Mindful Consumption? Paid Member

    This week, Magnolia Pictures releases its new movie Food, Inc. in theaters across the US. The film, which follows in the footsteps of recent films like Fast Food Nation, focuses on the shadowy and unchecked food industry that has grown in the US over the past 50 years. But while the film targets the handful of large corporations that control much of what appears on the shelves of grocery stores, it also suggests that our blissful ignorance as consumers who toss frozen chicken breasts and packaged lettuce into our grocery carts, actually makes us complicit in the ugly underbelly of the multi-billion dollar food industry. I was lucky enough to catch an advanced screening of the film which manages to be simultaneously troubling and hopeful as it exposes the history and future of American's food consumption. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Documentary on Stephen Batchelor Paid Member

    A 30-minute documentary on Stephen Batchelor's life and work aired on Dutch television in April of last year. I happened to be staying with Stephen and his wife, Martine, at their home near Bordeaux, shortly before the film aired. They hadn't seen it yet, so we watched it together on the computer in Stephen's office. The documentary takes its title from Stephen's most well-known work, Buddhism Without Beliefs, which Tricycle published in partnership with Riverhead Books in 1996. Stephen was writing the book when I first met him, so it was great to see and hear about his life before then. More »