Events

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Reading Burma Paid Member

    Last night on the anniversary (roughly speaking) of the Saffron Revolution, Tricycle's managing editor Alex Kaloyanides and I were privileged to attend Reading Burma: A Benefit for Cyclone Relief and Freedom of Expression in Burma/Myanmar. The evening was presented by PEN American Center, the Burma Project of the Open Society Institute, and The New York Review of Books. Supporting organizations were Cooper Union, which hosted the event in its Great Hall, where Lincoln once spoke, and Tricycle: The Buddhist Review. Salman Rushdie gave the opening remarks on behalf of PEN American Center and also read from the poetry of U Tin Moe. Other speakers included Paulo Sergio Pinheiro, who was the U.N.'s Special Rapporteur on human rights to Burma, the Venerable U Gawsita, who was one of the protest leaders, and Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk. A group of Burmese monks reciting the Metta Sutta wrapped things up. It was a great evening with lots of eye-opening footage from the protests and crackdown, and heartbreaking eyewitness accounts from Nargis -- alongside absurd, almost laughable official government reports of the same situations. The event raised more than $13,000 for cyclone relief. Special mention was made of U Win Tin's release, but of course the struggle continues. Pictures after the jump -- click to see larger versions. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Early Buddhist Manuscripts at the Met in NYC Paid Member

    Looks cool: This installation of thirty palm-leaf folios will feature some of the earliest surviving Indian illuminated manuscripts dating from the tenth to the thirteenth century. It will center on one remarkable Mahayanist Buddhist text, the Ashtasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra ("Perfection of Wisdom"), illustrated through the Museum’s rare holdings of eastern Indian and Nepalese illuminated palm-leaf manuscripts, book-covers, initiation cards, thankas, and sculptures. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Ariyaratne to speak in Michigan Paid Member

    Danny Fisher tells us that Dr. A.T. Ariyaratne, one of the titans of contemporary Buddhism and champion of nonviolence, will be speaking at Eastern Michigan University this September 21st. Over the years, in the face of violence and intimidation, Dr. Ariyaratne has made a brave journey seeking peace in war-torn Sri Lanka and across the globe. See Sarvodaya USA for more information. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Young Buddhists' Retreat Paid Member

    More info at the Zen Peacemakers site. Click pic for larger image. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Tibet-China Conflict Featured in this Week's The Economist Paid Member

    The Economist has published a lengthy report on the mass uprisings in Tibet earlier this year. The article is written from magazine's signature centrist point of view, and takes a relatively non-judgmental stance. The most interesting part is the author's musings on China's response to the riots in March. In a perplexing course of action, China did not react to the initial unrest with their usual level of brutal efficiency (several people were still killed). As a result, the chaos was allowed to spread far further than it may have otherwise. The article then goes on to offer cynical speculation on the motives of the Chinese government for their actions at the time(an excuse for the later wide-scale clampdown of the region, or caution leading up to the Olympics?), and then, the motives of all involved parties in general. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    When You're Falling, Dive Paid Member

    Manhattanites in the mood for Mark Matousek can head to the Barnes and Noble at 97 Warren St tonight at 7 pm. He'll be reading from his new book, When You’re Falling, Dive: Lessons in the Art of Living. More »