Events

  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Abstract & Concrete Paid Member

    Kongtrul Jigme Nyamgel, whose paintings have appeared in Tricycle, has a new show of "city-inspired paintings and photographs" opening in New York next week. Titled "Abstract & Concrete," the show gets my vote for best Buddhist pun of the month. Check out some of the artist's new work here, and see his website for more details. The show opens with a reception at 7 pm on June 18th at the New York Shambhala Center (118 W. 22nd St. #6). More »
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    Unmistaken Child Paid Member

    Oscilloscope Laboratories, producer of the critically acclaimed film Burma VJ, is now releasing Unmistaken Child, another important film for contemporary Buddhism. Unmistaken Child follows Tibetan monk Tenzin Zopa in his search for a reincarnation of his teacher, Lama Konchog, a world-renowned Tibetan master who passed away in 2001 at age 84. The film premieres at the Rubin Museum in New York this Sunday. It will open in theaters across the country throughout the summer. You can view the release schedule here. More »
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    Happy 30th! Paid Member

    To the renowned Antioch Education Abroad Buddhist Studies program. Story here. More »
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    Buddhism & Psychology podcast Paid Member

    The rapidly growing Interdependence Project has just announced its latest summer program: a 4-week series of classes on Buddhism and psychology, led by Joseph Loizzo, MD, PhD, and Miles Neale, PsyD, LMHC, both of the Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science. From the IDP website: In this four part series, Drs. More »
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    Daily Dharma, May 20, 2009 Paid Member

    Playing It Both Ways It seems as though we have no choice but to act as though the world is permanent, solid, and predictable, and, at the same time, we must realize that everything around us is impermanent, fluid, and unpredictable. If we go too far toward believing in permanence, we will be thrown when something unexpected happens. If we lean too far toward a belief in impermanence, we may fall into the trap of not setting clear goals, not achieving what is within our potential, and living irresponsibly. This can be a way of preventing ourselves from failure or sometimes protecting ourselves from success. –Marc Lesser, from Z.B.A.: Zen of Business Administration (New World Library) Want to receive Daily Dharma in your inbox every morning? More »