Events

  • Tricycle Bicycle: Ride-to-Work Week Paid Member

    It’s National Bike-to-Work Week! Didn’t bike to work this morning? No problem, Bike-to-Work Day is this Friday, May 21, so you’ve still got a few days to get organized. I rode to the Tricycle office this morning, and let me tell you, nothing encourages being in the moment quite like merging into traffic after whizzing off the Williamsburg Bridge. Also, if you’re a Buddhist bicyclist you should check out DharmaWheels—an organization that sponsors an annual Buddhist Bicycle Pilgrimage in Northern California.  This year’s ride, September 25 and 26, starts at Spirit Rock Meditation Center and finishes at Abhayagiri Monastery. It looks awesome! Registration opens August 20. More »
  • Andrew Olendzki at the Tricycle Book Club May starting 17th Paid Member

    Join us this Monday, May 17th, at the Tricycle Community Book Club as we begin discussing Andrew Olendzki’s new book, Unlimiting Mind: The Radically Experimental Psychology of Buddhism. Buddhist psychology can be a heavy subject, but Andrew manages to keep it light without losing any of his subject’s depth. More »
  • BuddhaFest: DC's First Buddhist Film Festival Paid Member

    Tickets are now on sale for BuddhaFest 2010 (June 17-20), a weekend of Buddhist films, talks and meditation sessions in Washington, DC. Highlights include the world premiere of Colors of Compassion: The Teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh followed by a Q&A with the film's director Eloise DeLeon and a discussion led by Ruymon Sensei. Other speakers include Lama Surya Das, Sharon Salzberg, Tara Brach, and Lama Tsony. This looks like it's going to be fun. Hope you can attend! More »
  • Honoring "Silent Mark" Paid Member

    In his recent Tricycle Online Retreat on Green Meditation, Clark Strand told the story of his friend Mark Rogosin.  A one time patent attorney in New York City, Rogosin suffered a mental breakdown and retreated to a simpler life in Woodstock, NY.  Often referred to as "Silent Mark," he was a man of very few words, and whether it was due to his wild scraggly beard or the fact that he once dug a massive perfectly circular hole in the ground for no apparent reason, he was viewed by many as quite the eccentric.  Nevertheless, Mark became famous in Woodstock for inscribing Buddhist characters onto thousands and thousands of stones and promptly gifting them to whoever would accept.  He did this for over twenty-five years until his death this l More »
  • Joan Oliver interviews Bernie Glassman on the Symposium for Socially Engaged Buddhism Paid Member

    From August 9th to 14th, 2010, the Zen Peacemakers will be hosting “The First Symposium for Western Socially Engaged Buddhism”, in Montague, MA.  It will be a gathering of leading Western activist practitioners, sponsors, and academics in this ever-important and growing field. Throughout the coming months, we at Tricycle will be posting a series of video interviews with prominent figures from the world of Socially Engaged Buddhism, beginning with this one with Bernie Glassman, who is a pioneer of the movement, founder of the Zen Peacemaker order, and co-organizer of the symposium. More »
  • Dick Allen Reads Poetry For The Tricycle Community Paid Member

    Five recordings of the great Buddhist poet Dick Allen are now available on the homepage of the Tricycle Community.  They are: “Zen Living”, “The American Zen Master”, “At the Shrine of the Lost Cause”, “Plum”, and “Meditation on Poems for the Nine Monks”. I had the tremendous privilege of getting to record this audio over the phone with Mr. Allen earlier this year. A massive snowstorm was bombarding New York City and I remember hanging on to his every word and phrase, completely losing track of time and space as I gazed out of our office window at giant snowflakes falling past the bricks and fire escapes of Tribeca.   It was quite an experience.  I am very happy to share them with you all now. They can be found here on the Tricycle Community homepage. More »