Events

  • Meditation Month Begins Today! Paid Member

    It might not say this on your desk calendars, but it's Meditation Month here at Tricycle! That means that starting today, it's time to join the Tricycle staff in making the commitment to sit every day of February—no exceptions and no excuses. We'll be blogging our triumphs and tribulations here and at Vipassana teacher Sharon Salzberg's "Real Happiness" website throughout the month. We'll also be sharing videos, audio interviews, articles, and tips from well-known Buddhist teachers that will help you develop and maintain a meditation practice. To start things off, you can download last year's Meditation Month e-book, Tricycle Teachings: Meditation, here.  Beginning Monday, February 4, you'll be able to: More »
  • On Pilgrimage Paid Member

    The following poem was submitted by Steve Kohn, a participant in last year's "In the Footsteps of the Buddha" Tricycle pilgrimage to India. He was inspired to submit the poem upon reading Pico Iyer's piece in the pilgrimage special section in the Fall 2012 issue of Tricycle.   Pilgrimage Come be a pilgrim with me.There is a place of great poverty,        With here and there A cow patty of wealth. Come, take a journey and seeGreat hungers feeding ill healthWith invisible poisons in water and air. More »
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    Jeff Bridges and Bernie Glassman Paid Member

    The Tricycle staff had a lot of fun last night at the NYC Union Square Barnes & Noble event featuring actor Jeff Bridges, Zen teacher Bernie Glassman, and Tricycle's very own editor and publisher James Shaheen. Jeff and Bernie were there to promote their recently released book The Dude and the Zen Master. If you've seen The Big Lebowski, you know which one is the Dude and which one is the Zen master, although many fans of the cult classic claim that the Dude is a Zen master. The two friends spent five days at Jeff's ranch in Montana doing what they call "jammin'" and what I like to call being on a "bro retreat"—chilling out, talking about life, and smoking cigars. Their conversation was recorded, transcribed, and voilà: The Dude and the Zen Master was born. More »
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    A Buddhist Holiday Survival Guide Paid Member

    'Tis the season to be jolly—and to grit your teeth and run through the gauntlet of what is commonly known as the holiday season. Whether it's gift shopping or socializing with your relatives that's got you down, Tricycle's month-long Buddhist Holiday Survival Guide is here to help. Throughout the month, Zen monk Brad Warner will be answering all of your practice questions, and midway through December, Zen teacher Ezra Bayda will be leading a discussion on dealing with those difficult relationship situations—in-laws, new partners, old family resentments—that tend to crop up over the holidays. More »
  • Real Buddha / Virtual Buddha Paid Member

    Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtanghsan, buddha sculptures and digital reconstructions, on New York’s Upper East Side.The great Buddhist reliquaries of the world—be they caves, mountainside monasteries, summit stupas, or ancient monuments—remain inaccessible to most due to their remoteness. Though great leaps in transportation technology have closed vast distances, both the pillaging of artifacts and the limiting of exposure in the interest of preservation continue to make visits to these far-flung sites difficult. Two alternatives act as windows that provide virtual access to these otherwise inaccessible environs: the removal of objects of worship into private collections and museums, whereby they can be admired by the privileged elite and the general public, respectively, or the creation of immaterial or easily transportable renderings—primarily photography, but also painting and, more recently, digital modeling. More »
  • The Weatherman's Legacy Paid Member

    This Thursday acclaimed director Pema Tseden will be screening his documentary film The Weatherman's Legacy at Trace Foundation. Made for Discovery Channel Asia in 2004, the film was made in Pema Tseden's hometown, where it follows a Tibetan shaman who wants to pass down his hailstorm-stopping and rain-making skills to a son who would rather run a video-rental business in the village instead. Worried that his reputation in the village is slipping, the shaman's last hope lies with his grandson, who is beginning to learn the ancient incantations. More »