Environment

  • "Eco-monastery" to open in the Buddha's birthplace Paid Member

    An “eco-monastery” will open in April in Lumbini, Nepal—the birthplace of the Buddha. The Lumbini Udyana Mahachaitya World Center for Peace and Unity (LUM), a project headed by Trungram Gyaltrul Rinpoche, will be the largest temple in Lumbini, at 48,600-square-feet, and has incorporated various “green” elements into its design—such as extra insulation, and relying on large area solar panels to generate all of the building’s lighting needs. Though it will be the largest temple in town, it will be the most environmentally friendly of all the buildings in the monastic zone of Lumbini, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dharmakaya, Rinpoche's organization, began construction on the project in 2006. More »
  • Food of Bodhisattvas: Buddhist Teachings on Abstaining from Meat Paid Member

    Due to Buddhist teachings on nonviolence and compassion, people often assume that Buddhists are vegetarians. Indeed, many Tricycle readers cried foul after we ran a recipe in the Winter 2010 issue that listed chicken as an ingredient. One letter to the editor said, "I feel this [recipe] is as disturbing in your magazine as it would be if it had been published in Vegetarian Times. Please no more chicken recipes." We printed a short response saying that while we respect vegetarianism, the fact is that many Buddhists eat meat. (Note: personally when I say I "respect" vegetarianism, I mean it in the "hold in high esteem" sense of the word, not like "I respect your right to eat whatever you like." Also, a fun fact: when it comes to dietary restrictions the Tricycle staff is a motley crew.) More »
  • Clark Strand to speak on 12 Steps of Ecological Recovery at Judson Church Paid Member

    We're all addicted to destoying the Earth. But we don't have to continue doing it. Clark Strand will be speaking about the 12 Steps to Ecological Recovery this Friday at Judson Memorial Chruch in New York City. Read about this exciting event here. You can also download a PDF about the event. Clark Strand's extraordinary movement bringing together ecologically minded people of all walks of life is gaining in force and strength every day—and would you believe it began right here at Tricycle? At least that's what we like to say. Here's a quick look at some of Clark's recent work with us: More »
  • The Practice of the Wild Paid Member

    Gary Snyder has been a mosquito, and Jim Harrison would like to be a tree. These are two important things we learn from watching The Practice of the Wild, a documentary by John J. Healey featuring the old codgers (San Simeon/ Whole Earth Films, produced by Will Hearst and Jim Harrison, 52 min., DVD, $18.95). Although it contains some archival footage and short interviews with friends and colleagues, the bulk of the film consists of a Q&A between Snyder and Harrison. Officially, it’s Harrison asking the questions and Snyder answering them—however, in truth, it’s a shared conversation. It’s a delight to watch the two friends as they amble across the Santa Lucia Mountains discussing the objects of their passions: the earth and its poetry. They make a likable pair. Where Snyder is refined and eloquent, a trim graybeard speaking with the authority of someone accustomed to being listened to, Harrison is unassuming, earthy, and unkempt. More »
  • Annapurna Artwork Paid Member

    In 2008 I trekked the Annapurna trail in Nepal with my artist friend Masha Gambarov. These are some drawings that she did after returning home. The following is her artist's statement. These four mixed media drawings were inspired by a 2008 trek along the Annapurna Circuit in Nepal. I had been to the region before, and had studied Tibetan Buddhism both academically and as part of a personal practice for years, but it was only after venturing into these mountains that I truly felt how rooted the Tibetan Buddhist tradition is in this rugged yet peaceful landscape. Somehow what I had experienced of Buddhist teachings was informing the way I saw the mountains around me, and the mountains were simultaneously teaching me of the beliefs and traditions flourishing among them. More »
  • No more industry in the Buddha's birthplace Paid Member

    The road to Lumbini, Nepal—the birthplace of the Buddha—is littered with industry. Cement companies, brick kilns, steel mills, and a paper mill all manufacture goods alongside the Bhairahawa-Lumbini highway, a stretch of land that falls within the Lumbini Protected Zone—an area of a 15km radius around the UNESCO World Heritage Site, meant to be industry-free. Though rules barring industry in the LPZ have not been enforced before now, Nepal's Prime Minister, Madhav Kumar Nepal, said Sunday that the government will not license new industries and will begin to crackdown on existing ones.      From Republica: More »