Environment

  • Buddha Buzz: Ecosattvas, enlightenment, and Aung San Suu Kyi Paid Member

    When Mara asks the Buddha to produce a witness to confirm his enlightenment, the Buddha touches the earth. Why? Because buddhas are earthly beings and, being spiritually awake, they can see that all of life is in cahoots. "Why the Buddha Touched the Earth," a recent piece at the Huffington Post, by John Stanley and David Loy explores this idea. Arguing that we have a responsibility to protect our earth through "sacred activism," Stanley and Loy introduce the idea of the "ecosattva." (Not to be confused with Clark Strand's "Green Bodhisattva.") More »
  • Good Earth Day Paid Member

    Hello Earth. What can we say to you on a day like today—your day—when the glaciers are melting and the rivers are rising? That we're sorry? We know that you're sick. We know that we've taken advantage of you, that we're responsible for your dangerously high temperatures. Should we apologize to you on your big day? At a moment like this, would it be awkward if we said "Thank you"?On this Earth Day I'm thinking of something that Kurt Vonnegut wrote towards the end of his life. The crucified planet Earth, should it find a voice and a sense of irony, might now well say of our abuse of it, “Forgive them, Father. They know not what they do.” The irony would be that we know what we are doing. When the last living thing has died on account of us, how poetic it would be if Earth could say, in a voice floating up perhaps from the floor of the Grand Canyon, “It is done. People did not like it here.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Watch beautiful video "108 Bowls: A Water Mala" Paid Member

    Happy World Water Day! In celebration of WWD, we're giving attention to water by watching "108 Bowls: A Water Mala." The beautiful video was produced by Hermitage Heart, an organization in Garrison, NY founded by Tricycle friend and contributor Bonnie Myotai Treace. From Hermitage Heart's website: More »
  • What the Water Knows Paid Member

    In honor of World Water Day, here's a poem by Sam Hamill from the pages of Tricycle: What the Water Knows What the mouth sings, the soul must learn to forgive. A rat’s as moral as a monk in the eyes of the real world. Still, the heart is a river pouring from itself, a river that cannot be crossed. It opens on a bay and turns back upon itself as the tide comes in, it carries the cry of the loon and the salts of the unutterably human. A distant eagle enters the mouth of a river salmon no longer run and his wide wings glide upstream until he disappears into the nothing from which he came. Only the thought remains. Lacking the eagle’s cunning or the wisdom of the sparrow, where shall I turn, drowning in sorrow? Who will know what the trees know, the spidery patience of young maple or what the willows confess? More »
  • Peace Begins on Our Plates Paid Member

    People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has released an ad featuring a Thich Nhat Hanh teaching: I am determined not to kill, not to let others kill, and not to support any act of killing in the world. We've run stories about animal rights in the past and have had lively discussion about the ethics of pet euthanasia, but it's not often that we've addressed strict veganism. Sam Mowe (you may know him on Twitter as "Tricycle Sam") has written about it here, though, and it always inspires debate—healthy debate. Take a look here and here. More »
  • "Eco-monastery" to open in the Buddha's birthplace Paid Member

    An “eco-monastery” will open in April in Lumbini, Nepal—the birthplace of the Buddha. The Lumbini Udyana Mahachaitya World Center for Peace and Unity (LUM), a project headed by Trungram Gyaltrul Rinpoche, will be the largest temple in Lumbini, at 48,600-square-feet, and has incorporated various “green” elements into its design—such as extra insulation, and relying on large area solar panels to generate all of the building’s lighting needs. Though it will be the largest temple in town, it will be the most environmentally friendly of all the buildings in the monastic zone of Lumbini, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dharmakaya, Rinpoche's organization, began construction on the project in 2006. More »