Environment

  • Tibet Earthquake Emergency Relief Paid Member

    From Tibetfund.org, We are very sad to report that hundreds have died and an estimated 10,000 mostly ethnic Tibetans were injured and left homeless in near-freezing temperatures in the aftermath of the earthquake that struck a sparsely populated region of Tibet in the early hours of April 14. More than 85 percent of the houses in Jiegu, a town of 100,000 people nearest the epicenter, were destroyed. Because solid information is still emerging from officials working in the area, it is difficult to know how many remain buried in the rubble. Most of the people in the region are Tibetan herders and farmers who are in immediate need of shelter, medicine, clothing and other necessities. More »
  • "The Known Universe" by AMNH/RMA Paid Member

    I just can't get enough of this video. Created by the American Museum of Natural History and used in the recent Rubin Museum of Art exhibition "Visions of the Cosmos", it is a journey from the Himalayas to the end of the universe, literally.  If you haven't seen it, it is definitely worth the six and half minutes it takes to watch it. Watch it here. More »
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    No more mercy for Mackey Paid Member

    Elephant Journal's Buddhist-in-Chief Waylon Lewis was kinder to Whole Foods CEO John Mackey than most. Mackey's Wall St. Journal op-ed slamming "Obama Care" wasn't enough to get Way to join the call to boycott the organic foods giant. Taking a more measured approach, Way argued for tolerance in his Huffington Post blog last August ("Why I Ain't About to Boycott Whole Foods"). But that's all over now. Previously a Mackey defender, Way now writes, "I'm finally losing it, and he's finally losing me." What was Way's tipping point? News that Mackey counts himself among the global warming skeptics. More »
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    Dalai Lama calls Obama's Nobel "a little early" Paid Member

    The Dalai Lama, who is still waiting for a chance to meet with the American President, calls the Nobel Peace prize award "a little early." Obama, in Norway to accept the prize now, might agree. More »
  • Shelter from the Storm Paid Member

    [UPDATED: Link fixed.] "The storm petrel is able to survive only by taking refuge in the vast ocean that surrounds it. Rather than allowing themselves to become overwhelmed by the enormity of their environment, these fragile and diminutive birds follow the paths of least resistance. During the worst weather, they place themselves deep down in the troughs of waves, using their delicate feet to push themselves away from the moving walls of wild water next to them, and letting the howling winds shear across the crests of waves high above. This is the bird's own spontaneous dance of resourcefulness and survival, and it is only one example of the countless ways in which sentient beings take refuge." - Gary Thorp, "Shelter from the Storm." Read the complete article here. More »
  • Prayer flags a problem in Bhutan Paid Member

    The Bhutanese government is facing an unexpected threat to its country's natural environment: prayer flags. Each year, Bhutan's citizens cut down thousands of trees to use a poles for Buddhist prayer flags, according to a Reuters report posted on the Buddhist Channel. This is making for a legal conundrum. Bhutan's famed Gross National Happiness index requires that forest-cover make up at least 60 percent of the Himalayan kingdom's landscape—but Buddhism, a guiding philosophy of the policy, is now contributing to the gradual deforestation of the region. Fortunately, it seems that a solution is in the works. The government is growing bamboo plants, with the hope that these will make for an acceptable substitute. [Image: TiagoPereira] More »