Dalai Lama

  • Sangye Gyatso and China's Long Memory Paid Member

    A week ago, Professor Robert Barnett wrote for the New York Review of Books, explaining some history to those curious why China is so sensitive to news of the 14th Dalai Lama's planned retirement—news that recently upset many Tibetans. He traces the cause back to the Fifth Dalai Lama, the first to hold temporal power, bestowed, as is well known, by the Mongol Khan (who, I think, was a follower of the Sakya school, not the Gelugs.) In the Fifth Dalai Lama's declining years, the new and ambitious Qing Dynasty claimed sovereignty over Tibet (and many other areas thousands of miles from their capital of Shenyang and later Beijing.) More »
  • The 100 most spiritually influential People? Guess who's #1... Paid Member

    No, it's not the Dalai Lama or Thich Nhat Hanh—they come in second and fourth, respectively—according to the Watkins Review's "100 Spiritual Power List," which appeared earlier this month. The review is put out by Watkins Books, the century-old London book store specializing in esoterica. Their selection criteria? There are several factors that were taken into account when compiling the list. Listed below are the main three: 1) The person has to be alive 2) The person has to have made a unique and spiritual contribution on a global scale 3) The person is frequently googled, appears in Nielsen Data, and highlighted in throughout the blogosphere It’s interesting to think about the amount of times that a person is googled; in a sense, being googled is a form of digital voting, and illustrates just how often someone is being sought outMore »
  • Pico Iyer on Tibet's Quiet Revolution Paid Member

    Pico Iyer writes on the Dalai Lama and Tibet's "quiet revolution" in a blogpost for the New York Review of Books: More »
  • Dalai Lama steps down from position as Tibet's political leader Paid Member

    Today, on the 52nd anniversary of the 1959 Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule, the Dalai Lama announced that he was formally relinquishing his role as political leader of the Tibetan exile government. The announcement, delivered in Dharamshala, India, has been understood as a move to strengthen the democratic structure of the Tibetan political movement as a new generation of Tibetan leaders emerges. From The New York Times: For years, the Tibetan spiritual leader has spoken of his desire to cede political authority, or “retire” as he sometimes put it. But in Thursday’s speech, the Dalai Lama made it official, announcing that he would propose the change during the session of the Tibetan parliament-in-exile that begins next week in Dharamsala, India. More »
  • Buddha on the Battlefield Paid Member

    Barack Obama's decision to double down on the war in Afghanistan has its supporters and detractors, but that we are largely insulated from the war's realities is indisputable. Differing from the Vietnam era—and in spite of the glut of information new technologies have made possible—images of the war and detailed and open discussion of its consequences are scarce in the mainstream media. You don't hear our representatives even discussing it much or at all when it comes to stretched budgets. And since the Democrats took power, open opposition has dropped off, as many moderates and liberals are afraid of "hurting Obama." I've discovered that many people are surprised when they learn that the U.S. has used phosphorous and cluster bombs in Afghanistan. We are preoccupied with other things, and the war is weakly reported. That we are poorly informed is understandable, but is it excusable? More »
  • Videos: The Dalai Lama on Blind Faith, Marxism, and Worrying Paid Member

    These videos of the Dalai Lama teaching in Sikkim were just uploaded to YouTube. I am not sure when they were filmed. via TaraOmBuddhaful, More »