China

  • Stephen Colbert: The 15th Dalai Lama? Paid Member

    In 2007, Stephen Colbert, host of Comedy Central’s The Colbert Report, announced his run for President of the United States. Now, in the midst of this week’s media frenzy regarding the question of the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso's successor, Colbert dropped another bombshell on the Nation: he will be the 15th Dalai Lama. Finally, a successor that both Tibetans and China can agree on. On a more serious note, the media, at the least at first, got this story mostly wrong. Read our coverage here. More »
  • The End of the Dalai Lama? Paid Member

    The Dalai Lama's likely reaction to the current media frenzy. An interview with the 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso by the Sunday edition of German paper Die Welt has caused quite a stir in the media and in Tibetan communities across the globe. More »
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    Buddha Buzz: Week of January 20th Paid Member

    My body’s too Buddhalicious for ya, babe These pictures from the pages of London’s notorious Daily Mail depict two naked statues, identified as the likenesses of the Buddha, atop a soup restaurant in the eastern Chinese city of Jinan, Shandong province. But is that really the usually svelte ancient Indian we know as the Buddha? More »
  • Treasury of Lives: Khenpo Jigme Phuntsok Paid Member

    Biography and autobiography in Tibet are important sources for both education and inspiration. The authors involved in the Treasury of Lives mine primary sources to provide English-language biographies of every known religious teacher from Tibet and the Himalaya, all of which are organized on their website. The following summarizes the biography of Khenpo Jigme Phuntsok, by Antonio Terrone.  More »
  • How Not to Mind Paid Member

    The following is inspired by the classic Chan poem "Xinxin Ming" (lit., “Trust-Mind Inscription”) by Jianzhi Sengcan (d. 606). More »
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    Consider the Source: Ordinary Mind Zen Paid Member

    Because the fundamental nature of consciousness, of mind itself, is without characteristics, Zen Buddhism teaches signlessness. Ordinary activity, reflected in the lives of monks or villagers, fully embodies this signless teaching about mind. This is the “Treasury of the True Dharma Eye, whose true sign is signlessness, the sublime Dharma gate,” as taught in Zen’s founding legend by the Buddha. The “sublime gate” of signlessness is not at all empty of meaning. Traditionally, taking Zen’s signless path leads first to perceiving, then seeing through, reincarnation, the “wheel of birth and death.” What is quite profound is then inextricable from what is entirely ordinary. It is passages about the “ordinary,” where the difference between sacred and mundane is forgotten, that Zen literature takes on its peculiar flavor. More »