Buddhist Teachings

  • Survival of the Kindest Paid Member

    Loving-kindness guru Sharon Salzberg points us via Twitter to an Ode article about Italian psychotherapist Piero Ferrucci, who tells us that happiness and freedom start with being kind: The most sensible way to look after our own self-interest, to find freedom and be happy, is not to directly pursue these things but to give priority to the interests of others. Help others to become free of their fear and pain. Contribute to their happiness. It’s all really very simple. You don’t have to choose between being kind to yourself and others. It’s one and the same. And in his book Survival of the Kindest, Ferrucci writes: People who are suffering don’t need advice, diagnoses, interpretations and interventions. They need sincere and complete empathy—attention. More »
  • What do Buddhists Believe? Paid Member

    Good question. And the answer will depend on who you ask. Is there a set of beliefs that all Buddhists share? I'm sure there's no definitive answer, but here's one noble credo that attempts to make it clear: This I believe: That phenomena do not have any kind of demonstrable, intrinsic existence. That anything that is the composite sum of other parts is, logically, impermanent. That suffering is a given in any form of existence where confusion and ignorance are present. That when confusion and ignorance have been definitively eliminated, and goodness, caring, and wisdom have entirely taken their place, that is true happiness. Click here for the entire article. More »
  • Daily Dharma: To sum it up, "Don't cling." Paid Member

    There's no school that says "Cling." Liberation is about cutting, or dissolving, or letting go of, or seeing through—choose your image—the attachment to anything. The description of the mind of no-clinging may be different in the different schools, but the experience of the mind of no-clinging is the same. How could it be different? –Joseph Goldstein, from "How Amazing! An Interview with Joseph Goldstein," Tricycle, Summer 1999 Read the complete article. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Realization through one's own effort Paid Member

    Laypeople live in the realm of sensuality. They have families, money, and possessions, and are deeply involved in all sorts of activities. Yet sometimes they will gain insight and see dharma before monks and nuns do. Why is this? Well, why? Read Ajahn Chah's "Meeting the Dharma Alone" here. More »
  • Why Pema Chodron became a Buddhist Paid Member

    "I became a Buddhist because I hated my husband," Pema Chodron tells us with a laugh. I always like to hear how people came to the dharma and this YouTube video doesn't disappoint. It wasn't until she read about the "power of negativity"—now a chapter in Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche's classic The Myth of Freedom—that Ani Pema began to see a way out—or through—the wreckage of her life. Take a watch, she tells us why she eventually became a nun, too. The clip has been up for quite a while (30,000 views) but if you haven't yet seen it (I hadn't), it's worth it. [Image: gampoabbey.org] More »
  • Mindfulness in Plain English and Beyond Paid Member

    The examiner.com has posted a short and sweet slide show of Bhante Henepola Gunaratana's Bhavana Society, the Appalachian Buddhist refuge tucked in the wilds of West Virginia. Bhante G, as he is affectionately called, is perhaps most widely known as the author of the bestselling classic Mindfulness in Plain English. Now, after nearly two decades, the Sri Lankan monk has followed up with an introduction to deeper states of meditation—Beyond Mindfulness in Plain English, currently available from Wisdom Publications. More »