Buddhist Teachings

  • Allan Lokos at the Tricycle Community Book Club Paid Member

    Starting April 19th, Allan Lokos will be leading the Tricycle Community Book Club in a discussion of his new book, Pocket Peace: Effective Practices for Enlightened Living. Allan is the founder and guiding teacher of the Community Meditation Center in New York City. From the pages of Pocket Peace: More »
  • “The Tree of Enlightenment” Paid Member

    As a Buddhist in the West, whether by my close non-Buddhist friends, semi-familiar acquaintances, or complete strangers, I have been asked many times to give a quick “general overview of Buddhism”. People often ask this very casually, as if they expect me to snap my fingers and summarize such a massive body of teachings, traditions, and histories, and voila, now you now about the Dharma! Personally, I find this task to be impossible. More »
  • Namkha Rinpoche visits Tricycle Paid Member

    Sopranos actor Michael Imperioli (aka Christopher Moltisanti) presented his film The Hungry Ghosts, his directorial debut, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City this month. The screening was a fundraiser for Namkha Rinpoche's charitable organization, The Golden Bridge Association, a not-for-profit dedicated to humanitarian aid and the preservation of Tibetan culture and religion. More »
  • Awakening is not the same thing as Bliss Paid Member

    There may be bliss with awakening, because it is actually a by-product of awakening, but it is not awakening itself. As long as we are chasing the by-product of awakening, we will miss the real thing. - Adyashanti, from “Bliss is a By-Product,” Tricycle, Summer 2009 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Don't be afraid of pain Paid Member

    Sometimes I think anticipation of pain is far worse than the pain itself. That's not to diminish the reality of pain, but it's a fact that we've all got to deal with it so why not find a way to be with it? It goes against the grain, but Buddhists have traditionally seen in pain an opportunity for practice. (Granted, this was before the Fentanyl patch.) Not for everyone, but for those it does work for, it makes plenty of good sense. Try it next time you've got a toothache on the weekend. Read Upasika Kee Nanayon's "Tough Teachings to Ease the Mind" here. More »
  • Seven Tips for Giving Up Gossip Paid Member

    by Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron 1. Recognize that gossip doesn’t undo the situation you’re talking about. It only puts in motion another situation based on negative feelings. 2. Know that comparing yourself to others is useless. Everyone has his or her own talents. In this way, give up jealousy and the wish to put others down. 3. Be aware of and transform your own thoughts, words, and deeds rather than commenting on those of others. 4. Train your mind to see others’ positive qualities and discuss them. This will make you much happier than gossiping ever could. 5. Forgive, knowing that people do harmful things because they are unhappy. If you don’t make someone into an enemy, you won’t want to gossip about him. More »