Buddhist Teachings

  • Martine Batchelor's Tricycle Retreat Begins Today: Breaking Bad Habits Paid Member

    Each of the Tricycle Retreats has its own flavor. Martine Batchelor's is probably the most personable—we even get to meet her cat and have a look at the view from here terrace at her home in South of France—red-tile roofs as far as the eye can see (Martine and husband, Stephen, live just outside Bordeaux). All this before we settle in to a clear and accessible teaching on the fundamentals of meditation. What I especially like is that Martine begins with the basics—always a great way to open a retreat. Later, she'll explain how the type of meditation she teaches can work to change our habits at a fundamental level. You can check out the first teaching for free here. More »
  • Do Less & Accomplish More Paid Member

    I'm sure multitasking has made me dumber and the NYT's lead this morning just confirmed my suspicions. But if Anna's post below disheartens you, here's the antidote: Marc Lesser's "Do Less & Accomplish More." Lesser offers step-by-step practical advice for making the most of your time. My own tip: Consider turning off TweetDeck, and let me know if you do: I haven't managed to pull the plug on it yet. More »
  • "The Buddha's actually right here..." Paid Member

    Here's Reggie Ray on Facebook: You read these books on Tibetan Buddhism, and it’s very 
complicated. Has anyone read any
 of those books? They’re very 
complicated. There are a lot of
 stages and paths and different levels, and sometimes you become completely
...confused. Eventually you begin to 
feel that the Buddha’s way up there you can barely see the top of the ladder—and it’s very important to remember that actually that’s a metaphor, and the Buddha’s actually right here. The closer we come to our own heart, the more we have gone through what they’re talking about. More »
  • Joan Halifax: On Grief and Buddhism Paid Member

    This dewdrop world Is but a dewdrop world. And yet, and yet— —Issa, Eighteenth-century Japanese poet Roshi Joan Halifax gave a beautiful talk on grieving last week, which is available as a podcast at the Upaya Institute and Zen Center’s website. One of the sources she uses for articulating the experience of grief is the stunning poem above, which she says “opens the hand of grief.” Joan is intimate with grief. It’s plain that she’s made an effort to come to know grief personally through experience, and she encourages others to open up to that experience as well. More »
  • Brazilian military police go Zen Paid Member

    If you've seen Pixote (or read newspapers), you probably don't hold Carioca policemen in high regard. But try Espirito Santo, a state in Brazil's southeast, where military police "are developing interpersonal relationship skills, emotional balance and discipline in a Zen Buddhist monastery." You can read more here. If you read Portuguese, you can see it in Globo. And if you don't, you can still watch the video there. More »
  • Celebrating the Return of Khyentse Rinpoche Paid Member

    I am very happy to help spread the news about Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche's first visit to the United States this August.  This trip will both serve as a commemoration of the life of Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910-1991) on the one-hundredth anniversary of his birth as well as a welcoming of his current incarnation, Khyentse Yangsi, to the United States.  May it be the first of many! More »