Buddhist Teachings

  • Joan Halifax: On Grief and Buddhism Paid Member

    This dewdrop world Is but a dewdrop world. And yet, and yet— —Issa, Eighteenth-century Japanese poet Roshi Joan Halifax gave a beautiful talk on grieving last week, which is available as a podcast at the Upaya Institute and Zen Center’s website. One of the sources she uses for articulating the experience of grief is the stunning poem above, which she says “opens the hand of grief.” Joan is intimate with grief. It’s plain that she’s made an effort to come to know grief personally through experience, and she encourages others to open up to that experience as well. More »
  • Brazilian military police go Zen Paid Member

    If you've seen Pixote (or read newspapers), you probably don't hold Carioca policemen in high regard. But try Espirito Santo, a state in Brazil's southeast, where military police "are developing interpersonal relationship skills, emotional balance and discipline in a Zen Buddhist monastery." You can read more here. If you read Portuguese, you can see it in Globo. And if you don't, you can still watch the video there. More »
  • Celebrating the Return of Khyentse Rinpoche Paid Member

    I am very happy to help spread the news about Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche's first visit to the United States this August.  This trip will both serve as a commemoration of the life of Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910-1991) on the one-hundredth anniversary of his birth as well as a welcoming of his current incarnation, Khyentse Yangsi, to the United States.  May it be the first of many! More »
  • Knowing the story doesn't solve it Paid Member

    A few days ago I posted an interview with Jack Kornfield and said I'd post an earlier interview with him soon. Well, here it is. The interview was given in 2000, around the time Kornfield's After the Ecstasy, The Laundry appeared. Here are two excerpts that will give you an idea of some of the modes of practice Jack was thinking about and teaching nearly a decade before the later interview. More »
  • How the clouds of thinking clear & 6 Words of Sage Advice Paid Member

    Ken McLeod is currently leading a Tricycle Retreat (you can listen to his first talk to "The Way of Freedom" here). Included in his teaching is his translation of Tilopa's Pith Instructions on Mahamudra. (Tilopa is considered the founder of Tibetan Buddhism's Kagyu lineage.) Here's a verse: Mists rise from the earth and vanish into space. They go nowhere, nor do they stay. Likewise, though thoughts arise, Whenever you see your mind, the clouds of thinking clear. More »
  • The Path of Supreme Optimism Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma: Buddhism is a path of supreme optimism, for one of its basic tenets is that no human life or experience is to be wasted or forgotten, but all should be transformed into a source of wisdom and compassionate living. This is the connotation of the classical statement that sums up the goal of Buddhist life: "Transform delusion into enlightenment." On the everyday level of experience, Shin Buddhists speak of this transformation as "bits of rubble turn into gold." Taitetsu Unno, "Number One Fool" (Spring 2008) Sign up for Daily Dharma here. Read the full article: Number One Fool More »