Buddhist Teachings

  • What is Mindful Eating? Paid Member

    Mindful eating is a practice that engages all parts of us—our body, our heart, and our mind—in choosing, preparing, and eating food. It immerses us in the colors, textures, scents, tastes, and even sounds of drinking and eating. It allows us to be curious and even playful as we investigate our responses to food and our inner cues to hunger and satisfaction. Mindful eating is not based on anxiety about the future but directed by the actual choices that are in front of you and by your direct experiences of health while eating and drinking. Mindful eating replaces self-criticism with self-nurturing. It replaces shame with respect for your own inner wisdom. - Jan Chozen Bays, "Mindful Eating" (Summer 2009) Click here to read the complete article. More »
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    Blogwatch: Wild Fox Zen Paid Member

    There's an excellent blog called Wild Fox Zen that you really should be reading. It's written by Dosho Port, a Soto Zen priest and disciple of Katagiri Roshi, the legendary Zen teacher who helped bring Buddhism to the American midwest. Dosho was kind enough to lead a discussion during Tricycle's online ango, The Big Sit, and is the author of the book Keep Me in Your Heart Awhile: The Haunting Zen of Dainin Katakiri. More »
  • From our friends at Ocean of Dharma: What makes a great teacher? Paid Member

    Visit the Ocean of Dharma blog and you may just win a free copy of The Collected Works of Dilgo Khyentse, one of the great Tibetan teachers of the last century. But you'll have to visit Ocean of Dharma and let them know what you think makes a great teacher. Recently, Triker Monty McKeever blogged on his own childhood experiences of Dilgo Khyentse and on his excitement about the upcoming visit of his 17-year-old incarnation, Khyentse Yangsi. For more about the Ocean of Dharma collected-works offer, see Carolyn Gimian's email pasted below. Carolyn is founding director of the Shambhala Archives. CELEBRATING DILGO KHYENTSE More »
  • Nalanda Benefit Paid Member

    If you’re in the neighborhood Wednesday evening (June 9)—and the interface of Buddhism and psychotherapy is your thing—Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science is hosting a panel discussion, “The Confluence of Two Streams: Buddhist Psychotherapy in the West,” at Tibet House in New York City. Participating are Nalanda’s founder and director, psychiatrist Joe Loizzo, and two other big names in the field, Paul Fulton, PhD, president of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and psychoanalyst Jeffrey Rubin, PhD, author of Psychotherapy and Buddhism. The conversation should be lively: moderating is Robert Thurman, the charismatic Columbia professor and president of Tibet House US. More »
  • A happiness that can't be taken from you (and four reasons we fear death) Paid Member

    What was behind the Buddha's decision to go off into the forest? A desire to be happy, Thai forest monk Thanissaro Bhikkhu teaches in the talk below. In fact, he says, this desire underlay all of Buddha's efforts. More »
  • Martine Batchelor's Tricycle Retreat Begins Today: Breaking Bad Habits Paid Member

    Each of the Tricycle Retreats has its own flavor. Martine Batchelor's is probably the most personable—we even get to meet her cat and have a look at the view from here terrace at her home in South of France—red-tile roofs as far as the eye can see (Martine and husband, Stephen, live just outside Bordeaux). All this before we settle in to a clear and accessible teaching on the fundamentals of meditation. What I especially like is that Martine begins with the basics—always a great way to open a retreat. Later, she'll explain how the type of meditation she teaches can work to change our habits at a fundamental level. You can check out the first teaching for free here. More »