Buddhist Teachings

  • Pema Chodron on Getting Hooked Paid Member

    In Tibetan there is a word that points to the root cause of aggression, the root cause also of craving. It points to a familiar experience that is at the root of all conflict, all cruelty, oppression, and greed. This word is shenpa. The usual translation is “attachment,” but this doesn’t adequately express the full meaning. I think of shenpa as “getting hooked.” Another definition, used by Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche, is the “charge”—the charge behind our thoughts and words and actions, the charge behind “like” and “don’t like.” Here’s an everyday example: Someone criticizes you. She criticizes your work or your appearance or your child. In moments like that, what is it you feel? It has a familiar taste, a familiar smell. Once you begin to notice it, you feel like this experience has been happening forever. That sticky feeling is shenpa. More »
  • Dharma/Arte: Trungpa inspired Brazil based arts community Paid Member

    “Genuine art reveals the truth.” -Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche “Mata-mor”, by Rodrigo Bueno Recently Tricycle asked our online supporters to recommend to us Buddhist charities and non-profits that are doing good work around the world. Among the many responses we received, there were several very enthusiastic endorsements of the group Dharma/Arte, a highly respected non-profit institution that promotes activities in the areas art and education. More »
  • What is Mindful Eating? Paid Member

    Mindful eating is a practice that engages all parts of us—our body, our heart, and our mind—in choosing, preparing, and eating food. It immerses us in the colors, textures, scents, tastes, and even sounds of drinking and eating. It allows us to be curious and even playful as we investigate our responses to food and our inner cues to hunger and satisfaction. Mindful eating is not based on anxiety about the future but directed by the actual choices that are in front of you and by your direct experiences of health while eating and drinking. Mindful eating replaces self-criticism with self-nurturing. It replaces shame with respect for your own inner wisdom. - Jan Chozen Bays, "Mindful Eating" (Summer 2009) Click here to read the complete article. More »
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    Blogwatch: Wild Fox Zen Paid Member

    There's an excellent blog called Wild Fox Zen that you really should be reading. It's written by Dosho Port, a Soto Zen priest and disciple of Katagiri Roshi, the legendary Zen teacher who helped bring Buddhism to the American midwest. Dosho was kind enough to lead a discussion during Tricycle's online ango, The Big Sit, and is the author of the book Keep Me in Your Heart Awhile: The Haunting Zen of Dainin Katakiri. More »
  • From our friends at Ocean of Dharma: What makes a great teacher? Paid Member

    Visit the Ocean of Dharma blog and you may just win a free copy of The Collected Works of Dilgo Khyentse, one of the great Tibetan teachers of the last century. But you'll have to visit Ocean of Dharma and let them know what you think makes a great teacher. Recently, Triker Monty McKeever blogged on his own childhood experiences of Dilgo Khyentse and on his excitement about the upcoming visit of his 17-year-old incarnation, Khyentse Yangsi. For more about the Ocean of Dharma collected-works offer, see Carolyn Gimian's email pasted below. Carolyn is founding director of the Shambhala Archives. CELEBRATING DILGO KHYENTSE More »
  • Nalanda Benefit Paid Member

    If you’re in the neighborhood Wednesday evening (June 9)—and the interface of Buddhism and psychotherapy is your thing—Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science is hosting a panel discussion, “The Confluence of Two Streams: Buddhist Psychotherapy in the West,” at Tibet House in New York City. Participating are Nalanda’s founder and director, psychiatrist Joe Loizzo, and two other big names in the field, Paul Fulton, PhD, president of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and psychoanalyst Jeffrey Rubin, PhD, author of Psychotherapy and Buddhism. The conversation should be lively: moderating is Robert Thurman, the charismatic Columbia professor and president of Tibet House US. More »