Buddhist Teachings

  • Swayed by the Movement of Mind Paid Member

    An ordinary person’s attention strays according to any movement of mind. Suddenly there is the confusion of believing in self and other, subject and object, and this situation goes on and on repeating itself endlessly. This is samsaric existence. The buddhas and bodhisattvas were successful in getting up on the dry land of enlightenment. But we sentient beings became bewildered, and are now in the unsuccessful, unsatisfactory state we all find ourselves in. We are still in the ocean of samsara; we have not yet gotten our heads fully out of the water. We have roamed about in one confused state of experience after the other, endlessly. At the same time, we haven’t lost our buddha nature. Our buddha nature is never separate from our minds for even a single instant. -Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche "Taking Your Future Into Your Own Hands" (Fall 2001) Read the complete article here. More »
  • Watch: Elizabeth Mattis-Namgyel on Empowerment Paid Member

    Teacher, scholar, and author Elizabeth Mattis-Namgyel speaks about the essential purpose of empowerment: to awaken our potential. She begins, Like all things on the Buddhist path, all the rituals, teachings, and practices have to do with awakening your Buddha potential, or clarity of mind.  The promise for all this is that we naturally have this wakeful mind but it gets obscured or confused. (continued) More »
  • Hothead? Cool your mind Paid Member

    Today the temperature in New York City is supposed to reach a sweltering 103 degrees. On the subway I watched as uncomfortable New Yorkers pushed past one another on the way from air-conditioned point A to air-conditioned point B with little regard for anyone else. Not only does the heat cause physical discomfort, it often turns us into hot heads—making us irritable and quick to anger. I myself find it hard to cool my mind when I can see the heat rising in waves from the pavement, so this morning I turned to the Tricycle archives for help. There I found "Hot and Heavy, Cool and Light," a piece on the Tibetan practice of tonglen by Judith Simmer-Brown: More »
  • Recalling Khyentse and Trungpa Rinpoches Paid Member

    This comes via the Newsfeed on the Celebrating the Return! website, which contains information on Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche's first visit to the US this August: Image: Karma Dzong newspaper records Khyentse Rinpoche's first visit to the US From the Celebrating the Return! newsfeed: More »
  • Angry, angry, angry Paid Member

    From Teabaggers (I never got used to "Tea Partiers" and stick with the name they gave themselves) to television news shriekers to the average Jane and Joe on the street (employed or not), Americans seem pretty testy lately. Just turn on cable or take public transportation—or read the blogs. Whether it's difficulty adjusting to the realities of the new century or to our much-changed role in the world, people are angry. So I thought I'd link to a short piece by Ken McLeod, who wrote on anger, its causes, and its remedies through mind-training (lojong), a practice Acharya Judy Lief writes about regularly for us at tricycle.com. More »
  • The Dharma Has No Owner Paid Member

    "There is a saying that “the dharma has no owner; it belongs to whomever is most diligent.” Sometimes people say, “I don’t have time to devote myself to practice, I’m doing a lot of different things and I am obliged to do them.” But honestly, it’s not that one has to go to some other place and close the door and be quiet in order to practice. That’s not the only way. It’s definitely the case that we can practice at any given moment. We can always try a little more to be kind, to be compassionate and be careful about what we do and say and so forth." -Chokyi Nyima "Keeping a Good Heart" (Spring 2002) Read the complete interview here. To sign up for Tricycle's Daily Dharma emails, click here. More »