Buddhist Teachings

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    Marc Lesser on accepting paradoxes Paid Member

    Marc Lesser, executive coach and Zen teacher, wrote the article "Do Less, Accomplish More" for Tricycle for our Fall 2009 issue. Doing less while accomplishing more sounds like a paradox, right? Well, Lesser has a new article up on the Huffington Post called "Accepting the Paradoxes in Your Life." He writes: More »
  • "Abbey Dharma" on Politics: Respect Others' Opinions Paid Member

    I think that calling oneself a Buddhist implies a dedication to non-greed, non-hatred, and non-delusion—a dedication that certainly transcends political stance. It would be wonderful if our sanghas welcomed political diversity and used practices of skillful speech to explain our opinions to one another. In situations that do not feel combative to me, I can work collegially. I can modify my position to accommodate others. I can recognize situations in which an attachment to a particular view has kept me from realizing a larger truth. What if we, as Buddhists in communities, were a model for the world political community? Sylvia Boorstein, "Dear Abbey Dharma" (Summer 2010) Click here to to read the complete article. Sign up to receive Tricycle's Daily Dharma emails here. More »
  • Learning to Accept Not-Knowing Paid Member

  • The Joy and Pain of Close Relationships Paid Member

    Today’s Daily Dharma, You do not learn non-attachment by disengaging and avoiding the intensity of relationships, their joy and their pain. It is easy to disguise as non-attachment what is not non-attachment at all, but your fear of attachment. When you really care about someone and you are willing to commit to that friendship, then you have fertile ground to learn about both attachment and non-attachment. That is what makes the marriage relationship so rich. -Judy Lief, "Tying the Knot" (Spring 1998) Read Judy Lief's commentary on labels and reactions from her ongoing teachings on Atisha's Lojong (mind-training) slogans here. More »
  • On disagreeing with the Dalai Lama Paid Member

    A few posts back I cited an AFP article in which the Dalai Lama, in advocating nonviolence, appeared to criticize the Sea Shepherds, a group of anti-whaling activists who have been much in the news lately. After the AFP article appeared, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society president Captain Paul Watson responded on the organization’s website, reiterating his group’s commitment to nonviolence while acknowledging the Dalai Lama’s past and present support:: More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Working with Labels and Reactions Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. 8. Three objects, three poisons, and three seeds of virtue. More »