Buddhist Teachings

  • Ken McLeod on Intention Paid Member

    In a recent talk at Unfettered Mind, Ken McLeod discusses different strategies for being able to implement intention. Intention is only half the battle; you have to be able to see it through. You intend to do something and then you do it. By strengthening intention, McLeod says, you can make things manifest in the world, you can change the direction you’re going in and break free of negative habitual patterns. An example of one of his strategies: Another way, and this is very useful for working with difficult situations, either internally or externally. Follow the gesture. This is a way of knowing what is happening. When you follow the gesture, and you know what is happening, then go another way. Do something different. It doesn’t really matter what you do as long as it is different. More »
  • Uproot the Core Problems Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma, In the Buddhist path we are bringing together our actions, our view, and our practice. It is a balance of awareness, insight, and action, working harmoniously together. In that way our energy is no longer divided or scattered, but we are fully present in whatever we do. That is what it means to be a genuine human being. More »
  • See Beyond "Black and White" Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma, The causes of any conflict lie in strong attachment to certain views, and the core of Buddha’s teaching is of great help here. All phenomena, in addition to being transient, arise and disappear according to a complex set of conditions. When we apply this truth to conflict, we give up the simplistic, black-and-white picture through which conflict is usually described and perpetuated. Views about the “good guys” and the “bad guys” simply do not correspond to the reality. -Zarko Andricevic, "Peace: How Realistic Is It?" (Summer 2003) Read the complete article here. More »
  • Trust With an Open Heart Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma, When we trust with our open heart, whatever occurs, “at that very moment that it occurs,” can be perceived as fresh and unstained by the clouds of hope and fear. Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche used the phrase “first thought, best thought” to refer to that first moment of fresh perception, before the colorful and coloring clouds of judgment and personal interpretation take over. “First thought” is “best thought” because it has not yet got covered over by all our opinions and interpretations, our hopes and fears, our likes and dislikes. It is direct perception of the world as it is. -Jeremy Hayward "First Thought" (Spring 1995) Read the complete article here. More »
  • Vision and Routine lead to Awakening Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma, "The key to development along the Buddhist path is repetitive routine guided by inspirational vision. It is the insight into final freedom—the peace and purity of a liberated mind—that uplifts us and impels us to overcome our limits. But it is by repetition—the methodical cultivation of wholesome practices—that we cover the distance separating us from the goal and draw ever closer to awakening." -Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi, "Vision and Routine" (Summer 2010) Read the complete article here. Artwork by Shinichi Maruyama More »