Buddhism

  • Breathless Paid Member

    Many meditators learn first to focus on the breath, following it mindfully in the manner described in the Satipatthana Sutta; counting breaths in a way frequently taught at Zen centers; or using one of the many methods of pranayama from yoga. None of these work very well when breathing is compromised. I recently recovered from a bout of pertussis (“whooping cough”)—what the Chinese call the hundred-day cough. For three months my meditation was marked by a heavy chest and constricted bronchioles, and deep breaths would bring on paroxysms of coughing. More »
  • A Shamarpa without Borders Paid Member

    KATHMANDU, Nepal—It was the kind of ceremony that the honored guest seemed to be directing from the Beyond: thousands of students and admirers, from peons to a Nepalese government minister, converging on a half-built monastery to attend the traditional cremation rite of a vajra master that, even in death, stirred up an international fuss. They came to honor the 14th Shamar Rinpoche, Mipham Chokyi Lodro (1952–2014), a spiritual force who understood that staying true to his calling as the second-highest ranking lama of the Karma Kagyu order wouldn't win him any dharmic popularity contests. To many, he was a polarizing figure, an uncompromising traditionalist. More »
  • From Monastery to Marketplace Paid Member

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    The Monk Scam Paid Member

    New York’s Times Square is full of people asking for money. Although the neighborhood has lost just about all its grit, scams of all sorts still crop up in the area, evergreen as it is with vulnerable tourists. The latest breed of scammers, profiled in a recent New York Times article, come dressed in monk’s robes. More »
  • Four Ennobling Truths Paid Member

    This article is the eighth in the Tricycle blog series 10 Misconceptions about Buddhism with scholars Robert E. Buswell Jr. and Donald S. Lopez Jr.  More »
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    No Try, Just Do Paid Member

    They make a fairly odd couple. The television and film star Steve Buscemi (Boardwalk Empire, The Big Lebowski) sits alongside Shambhala nun Karma Trime Lhamo, the director of Princeton Buddhist Meditation Group. The setting is incongruous, too: a park bench in the middle of an exhibit at the Rubin Museum of Art. But this strange alchemy—comprising episode six of Buscemi’s web series Park Bench—is an unequivocal delight. Buscemi asks sincerely felt, straightforward questions, while Ani Trime responds with wisdom reminiscent of her late teacher, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Watch as she shares her thoughts on dukkha, meditation, and the importance of being kind.  More »