Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Buddhawatch Paid Member

    Not quite a Buddha but a Tara in Ensenada, Mexico, which, according to Leslie, "was a gift of peace and friendship from a Nepalese international cultural organization in 1993." Leslie laments the graffiti, which was not there when she visited. You can see it and read about it here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Buddhawatch Paid Member

    Atop Corocovado mountain, in Rio de Janeiro's Sao Cristovão district, stands the famous open-armed Christ the Redeemer (Cristo Redentor), welcoming visitors to the "Marvelous City." Not quite so high but perhaps no less impressive (in spirit, at least) is Wat Phra That Khao Noi, a temple in northern Thailand, with its towering Buddha  keeping watch over the Nan valley. Its hilltop perch rises 800 feet above the town below. Add a comment with a link to your favorite Buddha and we'll pick one to include in our next Buddhawatch post. More »
  • Crazy for mandalas Paid Member

    Art critic Holland Cotter of the New York Times loves the Rubin Museum of Art, in New York City. And he's positively exuberant about the museum's current mandala exhibit ("The Mandala: The Perfect Circle" is the first of a series of three), even threatening to camp out at the Chelsea sanctuary for Himalayan art for the rest of the summer and into fall. You'll see what he means if you get a chance to visit for yourself. To read Cotter's review, click here. More »
  • You can't "think out" your life Paid Member

    Most are under the impression that they can think out their lives. But that's a misconception. We are subject to our emotions and think in ways based on our emotions. So it's extremely important to do something about our emotions. –Aya Khema Read the rest here. More »
  • Remembering Buddhism in Afghanistan Paid Member

    On the eve of Afghanistan's presidential elections amidst increasing unrest and violence, CNN contributor John Blake details the history of a country strikingly different than the Afghanistan we know today. While recent media coverage has centered on America's troops in Afghanistan and the wave of violence leading up to tomorrow's elections, Blake instead focuses on the country's untold story, exploring the social climate of Afghanistan during the "golden era" of the 1950's, 60's, and 70's. Back then Kabul was known as "the Paris of Central Asia," the moderately religious government recognized women's rights, and the country was politically stable. Blake delves into the roots of this peace and tolerance, interviewing Afghanis who believe that it can be traced back to a time when Afghanistan stood at the crossroads of ancient civilizations and the Silk Road allowed people of many cultures and religions to mix easily. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Engaged Buddhism with sprinkles Paid Member

    In a new article on the the Buddhist Channel, Ven. Kobutsu Malone, Osho, writes: Engaged Buddhism is not a “flavor” of Buddhism that we can choose as if we are at a “Buddhist” ice cream counter. “I’ll have a scoop of engaged and a scoop of personal… with sprinkles please!” Engaged practice is not about “choosing” to be “engaged” or not, more likely engaged practice chooses us. The piece, entitled "Engaged Buddhism is not personal practice, it's the 'whole practice,'" picks apart the distinction between self-help perspectives on Buddhist practice and Buddhist avenues to social engagement. The point has been made before, but thanks is due for this succinct article. Give it a read. More »