Buddhism

  • Sri Lanka's "blend of faiths" a cause for hope Paid Member

    In the September issue of the Atlantic, Robert Kaplan writes that any hope for a lasting peace in Sri Lanka will depend on its ability to reconnect to the "blend of faiths" that lay at the very foundation of the ancient Kingdom of Kandy, from which the famous city in the island's heartland takes its name: More »
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    Brain activity in nondual meditators and Alzheimer's sufferers "strikingly similar" Paid Member

    "[S]tudies suggest that there could be a striking similarity between the brains of meditators and those of people with dementia or depression." It's true, but it's not quite what it sounds like. While ordinary brains switch between two neural networks—one externally focused and the other internally focused—skilled meditators who reach "a state of oneness" seem to keep both networks going at once. Surprisingly, the same holds true for and those suffering from dementia, depression, or Alzheimer's. More »
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    16-year-old high school soccer player finds the middle way Paid Member

    Sixteen-year-old Jimmy O'Leary, a high school junior at St. John’s Prep, an all-boys Catholic school in Danvers, Massachusetts, made the Boston Globe this weekend for taking up an interest in Buddhism. Says his soccer coach, Rene Novoa, who began coaching O'Leary six years ago: “All of a sudden, he was more calm, he was more collected when things didn’t go his way. He’s developed into my go-to guy, but his mental maturity is now catching up with his physical skills.’’ More »
  • Buddhism: Religion, Science, Both? Paid Member

    The "secularization" of Buddhism in the West has its countless proponents. But its secularization may often be little more than a wrong-headed denial of its religious roots. At least that's what we hear from our favorite Buddhist Geek Vincent Horn, who has posted to the Interdependence Project's "One City" blog, hosted by Beliefnet. While Horn acknowledges some of the positive effects of the secularization of Buddhist practice, in general, the trend doesn't sit well with him: More »
  • Does Buddhism serve as a bridge? Paid Member

    Can Buddhism strengthen ties to the church? An article in Sunday's Denver Post suggests that it does. Author Electa Draper investigates a growing interest in the meditative and spiritual aspects of Buddhism amongst Christian Americans, finding that many employ eastern religions as a tool to forge a deeper connection to their Christian beliefs. For many Christians cut off from the past, or alienated from the faith of their upbringing, Buddhism has served as the bridge to ancient wisdom. "The problem is the contemplative tradition in the Christian Church has had its ups and downs over the centuries," said Father Thomas Keating, a Trappist monk and leader in the Centering Prayer movement, a modern revival of Christian contemplative practice. "We sensed that the Eastern religions, with their highly developed spirituality, had something we didn't have," Keating said. More »
  • Internet Dharma Talks from Jampal Norbu Namgyal Paid Member

    Yesterday, Jampal Norbu Namgyal, the tweny-one-year-old son of Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche, gave his first dharma talk to his father’s entire sangha. The talk—called "From the Cushion to the Grocery Store: Developing Positive Habits"—was part of a new series of free weekly dharma talks delivered via internet by Rinpoche, his wife Elizabeth Namgyal, and Jampal. The series, currently airing from Boulder and Crestone, Colorado, is called the Link, and takes place every Sunday at ten o’clock, mountain time. More »