Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    A Buddhist's Guide to Twitter Paid Member

    As someone slow to embrace the Twitter phenomenon, I've approached the site with great caution, and perhaps a touch of suspicion. I often wondered if I could use Twitter without falling victim to my ego and shamelessly indulging in detailing the ins-and-outs of my day, giving a digital voice to my inner monologue. Determined not to be the last person on earth who wasn't "tweeting," I did some research and found the advice of Soren Gordhamer especially helpful. In a recent Huffington Post blog post "If the Buddha Used Twitter..." Gordhamer suggests 5 ways in which the Buddha might have approached Twitter, reminding us that it's not what we tweet but how we live away from our online worlds that really matters: More »
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    Japan's "masculinity crisis" Paid Member

    Have Japan's men become too feminine? It's become a subject of national debate in samurai country, and it has many worried. According to one Japanese insurance company,  75% of the 1,000 twenty- and thirty-something men it polled consider themselves "grass-eating men"—young male herbivores who have opted out of the rat race that characterized the the boom of decades past. Companies now fear that their "effeminate" ways threaten to further undermine Japan's long-troubled consumer economy. As Slate's Alexandra Harney has it: Japanese companies are worried that herbivorous boys aren't the status-conscious consumers their parents once were. They love to putter around the house. According to Media Shakers' research, they are more likely to want to spend time by themselves or with close friends, more likely to shop for things to decorate their homes, and more likely to buy little luxuries than big-ticket items. More »
  • Feeding Your Demons Paid Member

    We all have demons. They're not nasty ghouls or goblins or things with horns—they're worse. In "Feeding Your Demons," from the Summer 2008 Tricycle, Tsultrim Allione describes them this way: Demons are our obsessions and fears, feelings of insecurity, chronic illnesses, or common problems like depression, anxiety, and addiction. Feeding our demons rather than fighting them may seem to contradict the conventional approach of attacking and attempting to eliminate that which assails us, but it turns out to be a remarkable alternative and an effective path to liberation from all dichotomies. More »
  • Sharon Salzberg turns up on Daily Kos Paid Member

    Daily Kos diarist "Geenius at Wrok" has an affinity for vipassana meditation, and today writes at some length on his introduction to Sharon Salzberg's teachings on metta (loving-kindness) practice. GaW even manages to send good thoughts to Sen. Chuck Grassley (überR-Iowa, pictured here)—no mean feat for a Daily Kos diarist. He also adds a political touch of his own, though, which some may consider cheating: May you be free of pain and sorrow. May you also help end needless pain and sorrow caused by pvt health ins. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Mandalas, Jung and the Cosmos Paid Member

    It never gets dull at the Rubin Museum of Art, in New York City. Home to a one of—if not the—most comprehensive collections of Himalayan art, the Rubin never disappoints. This August the museum, housed in what was once Barney's downtown fashion emporium, will begin a three-part "Cosmology series," leading with an exhibit on the history and meaning of the mandala. "The Mandala: The Perfect Circle," opens on August 14th and runs through January 11, 2010. According to Martin Brauer, the museum's chief curator, More »
  • Pico Iyer on the Dalai Lama Paid Member

    Nice blog post on the Dalai Lama by Pico Iyer. Here's a taste: Not long ago, I was traveling with the Dalai Lama across Japan and another journalist came into our bullet-train compartment for an interview. “Your Holiness,” he said, “you have seen so much sorrow and loss in your life. Your people have been killed and your country has been occupied. You have had to worry about the welfare of Tibet every day since you were four years old. How can you always remain so happy and smiling?” "My profession," said the Dalai Lama instantly, as if he hardly had to think about it. Read "The Doctor is Within" here. More »